The pain of diabetic nerve damage may respond to traditional treatments with certain medications such as gabapentin (Neurontin), phenytoin (Dilantin), and carbamazepine (Tegretol) that are traditionally used in the treatment of seizure disorders. Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) and desipramine (Norpraminine) are medications that are traditionally used for depression. While many of these medications are not indicated specifically for the treatment of diabetes related nerve pain, they are used by physicians commonly.
It is recommended that all people with type 2 diabetes get regular eye examination.[13] There is weak evidence suggesting that treating gum disease by scaling and root planing may result in a small short-term improvement in blood sugar levels for people with diabetes.[81] There is no evidence to suggest that this improvement in blood sugar levels is maintained longer than 4 months.[81] There is also not enough evidence to determine if medications to treat gum disease are effective at lowering blood sugar levels.[81]

The role of physical activity must be considered. Increased levels of daily activity bring about decreases in liver fat stores (43), and a single bout of exercise substantially decreases both de novo lipogenesis (39) and plasma VLDL (92). Several studies demonstrated that calorie control combined with exercise is much more successful than calorie restriction alone (93). However, exercise programs alone produce no weight loss for overweight middle-aged people (94). The necessary initial major loss of body weight demands a substantial reduction in energy intake. After weight loss, steady weight is most effectively achieved by a combination of dietary restriction and physical activity. Both aerobic and resistance exercise are effective (95). The critical factor is sustainability.


Genetic variations likely act together with health and lifestyle factors to influence an individual's overall risk of type 2 diabetes. All of these factors are related, directly or indirectly, to the body's ability to produce and respond to insulin. Health conditions that predispose to the disease include overweight or obesity, insulin resistance, prediabetes (higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that do not reach the cutoff for diabetes), and a form of diabetes called gestational diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Lifestyle factors including smoking, a poor diet, and physical inactivity also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels. If you have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good," cholesterol, your risk of type 2 diabetes is higher. Triglycerides are another type of fat carried in the blood. People with high levels of triglycerides have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Your doctor can let you know what your cholesterol and triglyceride levels are.
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