Most strokes happen when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel within or leading to the brain. Type 2 diabetes increases your risk of stroke by two to four times, according to the National Stroke Association. Fortunately, the same steps that will help you prevent heart disease — controlling your blood sugar and blood pressure levels, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, and not smoking — are also the best ways to help reduce your risk of stroke.
Periodontal disease is the most common dental disease affecting those living with diabetes, affecting nearly 22% of those diagnosed. Especially with increasing age, poor blood sugar control increases the risk for gum problems.  In fact, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for gum problems because of poor blood sugar control. As with all infections, serious gum disease may cause blood sugar to rise. This makes diabetes harder to control because you are more susceptible to infections and are less able to fight the bacteria invading the gums.
An individual with type 2 diabetes has the same level of heart attack risk as someone who's already had a heart attack, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. There are numerous reasons for the link between diabetes and heart disease, Dr. Sullivan says, including a "group attack" from diabetes and other heart disease risk factors like high blood pressure and high cholesterol, which already affect many people with type 2 diabetes.

Endocrinology is the specialty of medicine that deals with hormone disturbances, and both endocrinologists and pediatric endocrinologists manage patients with diabetes. People with diabetes may also be treated by family medicine or internal medicine specialists. When complications arise, people with diabetes may be treated by other specialists, including neurologists, gastroenterologists, ophthalmologists, surgeons, cardiologists, or others.
^ Qaseem A, Wilt TJ, Kansagara D, Horwitch C, Barry MJ, Forciea MA (April 2018). "Hemoglobin A1c Targets for Glycemic Control With Pharmacologic Therapy for Nonpregnant Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Guidance Statement Update From the American College of Physicians". Annals of Internal Medicine. 168 (8): 569–576. doi:10.7326/M17-0939. PMID 29507945.
Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
Studies in type 1 patients have shown that in intensively treated patients, diabetic eye disease decreased by 76%, kidney disease decreased by 54%, and nerve disease decreased by 60%. More recently the EDIC trial has shown that type 1 diabetes is also associated with increased heart disease, similar to type 2 diabetes. However, the price for aggressive blood sugar control is a two to three fold increase in the incidence of abnormally low blood sugar levels (caused by the diabetes medications). For this reason, tight control of diabetes to achieve glucose levels between 70 to120 mg/dl is not recommended for children under 13 years of age, patients with severe recurrent hypoglycemia, patients unaware of their hypoglycemia, and patients with far advanced diabetes complications. To achieve optimal glucose control without an undue risk of abnormally lowering blood sugar levels, patients with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose at least four times a day and administer insulin at least three times per day. In patients with type 2 diabetes, aggressive blood sugar control has similar beneficial effects on the eyes, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels.
The guideline D&I committee co-chairs developed a process of prioritizing and distilling key messages relevant to primary care from 313 recommendations in 38 guideline chapters (Figure 1).8 The prioritization was completed anonymously by members of the guideline writing committee, people with diabetes, and members of the D&I committee. Given the large number of recommendations, the first step of the prioritization exercise was to select guideline chapters; each member was asked to select 10 chapters, then, from these chapters, to select and rank 10 recommendations. Based on the number of votes for each recommendation, a list of 22 recommendations was compiled. This was followed by thematic analysis and member checking to summarize key messages. Specifically, the co-chairs (endocrinologist C.H.Y. and FP N.M.I.) collaboratively sorted the recommendations into conceptually similar groups (themes) and drafted key messages that represented these themes. Next, they sought input from the committee members to refine the key messages, similar to the process of member checking in qualitative research.11

Though it may be transient, untreated GDM can damage the health of the fetus or mother. Risks to the baby include macrosomia (high birth weight), congenital heart and central nervous system abnormalities, and skeletal muscle malformations. Increased levels of insulin in a fetus's blood may inhibit fetal surfactant production and cause infant respiratory distress syndrome. A high blood bilirubin level may result from red blood cell destruction. In severe cases, perinatal death may occur, most commonly as a result of poor placental perfusion due to vascular impairment. Labor induction may be indicated with decreased placental function. A caesarean section may be performed if there is marked fetal distress or an increased risk of injury associated with macrosomia, such as shoulder dystocia.[50]


Your doctor may recommend working with a registered dietitian and a personal trainer to help you set up a diabetes weight loss plan. "Diet and exercise is always encouraged as the first line of therapy, but it works better for some people than others," says Sullivan. If you’re obese and having trouble losing weight with diet and exercise alone, your doctor may recommend medications to suppress your appetite and promote weight loss, or even gastric bypass surgery.
Management of type 2 diabetes focuses on lifestyle interventions, lowering other cardiovascular risk factors, and maintaining blood glucose levels in the normal range.[24] Self-monitoring of blood glucose for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes may be used in combination with education,[73] although the benefit of self-monitoring in those not using multi-dose insulin is questionable.[24] In those who do not want to measure blood levels, measuring urine levels may be done.[73] Managing other cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, high cholesterol, and microalbuminuria, improves a person's life expectancy.[24] Decreasing the systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mmHg is associated with a lower risk of death and better outcomes.[74] Intensive blood pressure management (less than 130/80 mmHg) as opposed to standard blood pressure management (less than 140-160 mmHg systolic to 85–100 mmHg diastolic) results in a slight decrease in stroke risk but no effect on overall risk of death.[75]
Managing diabetes involves knowing your numbers. Glooko monitors your medications, carb intake, and more. It integrates data from most continuous glucose monitors, blood glucose meters, insulin pumps, and fitness trackers. View your progress via charts and keep track of your history. If your doctor sponsors you, or your employer or insurer covers the fee, the app can be used completely free of charge.
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