The number of people with diabetes is rising, both in Canada and around the world. Here in Canada, about 3.4 million have diabetes: that’s just over 9% of our total population. Unfortunately, that number is expected to rise. Diabetes Canada estimates that by 2025, 5 million people (12% of the population) will have diabetes. Around the world, the numbers are similarly gloomy. The World Health Organization estimates that the prevalence of diabetes in people older than 18 years of age rose from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014.

Rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione, has not been found to improve long-term outcomes even though it improves blood sugar levels.[95] Additionally it is associated with increased rates of heart disease and death.[96] Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) prevent kidney disease and improve outcomes in those with diabetes.[97][98] The similar medications angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) do not.[98] A 2016 review recommended treating to a systolic blood pressure of 140 to 150 mmHg.[99]

A donation of securities or mutual fund shares is the most efficient way to give charitably since the capital gains tax does not apply. Your security or mutual fund donation means a larger donation for the charities you support. It also means a larger charitable tax receipt for you. We’re the largest processor of online security and mutual fund donations in Canada. And, we make it easy to disburse your donation across multiple charities.


I just wanted to let you know about an app that I use and love. The app is called “Diabetes:M”. It is free and has helped me manage my diabetes. I am a Type 1. It lets you log carbs, insulin, etc. and you can send all of the info from it by e-mail to your provider. It has graphs and charts that help out a lot as well. Hope this helps someone else as much as it has helped me. Thanks.

Although a defect in mitochondrial function is associated with extremes of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle (30), this does not appear to be relevant to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. No defect is present in early type 2 diabetes but rather is directly related to ambient plasma glucose concentration (31). Observed rates of mitochondrial ATP production can be modified by increasing or decreasing plasma fatty acid concentration (32,33). Additionally, the onset of insulin stimulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis is slow, gradually increasing over 2 h, and quite distinct from the acute onset of insulin’s metabolic effects (34). Although it remains possible that secondary mitochondrial effects of hyperglycemia and excess fatty acids exist, there is no evidence for a primary mitochondrial defect underlying type 2 diabetes.
The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority acknowledges that it provides health services in facilities located on the original lands of Treaty 1 and on the homelands of the Metis Nation. WRHA respects that the First Nation treaties were made on these territories and acknowledge the harms and mistakes of the past, and we dedicate ourselves to collaborate in partnership with First Nation, Metis and Inuit people in the spirit of reconciliation.
^ Sattar N, Preiss D, Murray HM, Welsh P, Buckley BM, de Craen AJ, Seshasai SR, McMurray JJ, Freeman DJ, Jukema JW, Macfarlane PW, Packard CJ, Stott DJ, Westendorp RG, Shepherd J, Davis BR, Pressel SL, Marchioli R, Marfisi RM, Maggioni AP, Tavazzi L, Tognoni G, Kjekshus J, Pedersen TR, Cook TJ, Gotto AM, Clearfield MB, Downs JR, Nakamura H, Ohashi Y, Mizuno K, Ray KK, Ford I (February 2010). "Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials". Lancet. 375 (9716): 735–42. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61965-6. PMID 20167359.
The pain of diabetic nerve damage may respond to traditional treatments with certain medications such as gabapentin (Neurontin), phenytoin (Dilantin), and carbamazepine (Tegretol) that are traditionally used in the treatment of seizure disorders. Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) and desipramine (Norpraminine) are medications that are traditionally used for depression. While many of these medications are not indicated specifically for the treatment of diabetes related nerve pain, they are used by physicians commonly.
Type 2 (formerly called 'adult-onset' or 'non insulin-dependent') diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly (this is also referred to as ‘insulin resistance’). This form of diabetes usually occurs in people who are over 40 years of age, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes, although today it is increasingly found in younger people.

Other technology devices, like physical activity trackers, are being integrated with some continuous glucose monitor (CGM) systems to help demonstrate how activity impacts blood glucose levels. In the fall of 2017, Fitbit partnered with Dexcom to bring CGM data to Fitbit Ionic. Some health-care programs, like UHC Medicare Advantage plans, are even providing piloting programs in which participants who use CGM technology, like Dexcom, are receiving Fitbit activity trackers.
^ Boussageon R, Bejan-Angoulvant T, Saadatian-Elahi M, Lafont S, Bergeonneau C, Kassaï B, Erpeldinger S, Wright JM, Gueyffier F, Cornu C (July 2011). "Effect of intensive glucose lowering treatment on all cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and microvascular events in type 2 diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials". BMJ. 343: d4169. doi:10.1136/bmj.d4169. PMC 3144314. PMID 21791495.
For this manuscript, we sought further input from FPs on the D&I committee to ensure that no important recommendations or concepts had been missed in summarizing the high-priority aspects of the guideline for the management of people with type 2 diabetes by FPs. This involved providing these FPs with the full list of recommendations via e-mail and asking them to identify any missing high-priority recommendations. During the process of converting themes into key messages, and during the process of writing this manuscript, input was sought from members of the D&I committee who live with diabetes to ensure that the content was informed by their needs and perspectives. As a final step, the entire committee identified tools that might support implementation of the key messages. To the extent possible, tools are informed by evidence regarding implementation of evidence in practice.12–15 Some of these tools are identified in this manuscript; these and many others can be accessed at guidelines.diabetes.ca.
Other technology devices, like physical activity trackers, are being integrated with some continuous glucose monitor (CGM) systems to help demonstrate how activity impacts blood glucose levels. In the fall of 2017, Fitbit partnered with Dexcom to bring CGM data to Fitbit Ionic. Some health-care programs, like UHC Medicare Advantage plans, are even providing piloting programs in which participants who use CGM technology, like Dexcom, are receiving Fitbit activity trackers.

“We usually see patients quarterly for appointments, which means the other 361 days of the year, they’re on their own,” says endocrinologist Amber Champion, MD, at Great Plains Health in North Platte, Nebraska. “They need to have the knowledge and tools to take care of themselves. Diabetes-related apps can be useful to help keep track of all the data and see it visually. They can also help educate and teach patients to spot trends and keep their data organized.”


Whole-body insulin resistance is the earliest predictor of type 2 diabetes onset, and this mainly reflects muscle insulin resistance (26). However, careful separation of the contributions of muscle and liver have shown that early improvement in control of fasting plasma glucose level is associated only with improvement in liver insulin sensitivity (20,21). It is clear that the resumption of normal or near-normal diurnal blood glucose control does not require improvement in muscle insulin sensitivity. Although this finding may at first appear surprising, it is supported by a wide range of earlier observations. Mice totally lacking in skeletal muscle insulin receptors do not develop diabetes (27). Humans who have the PPP1R3A genetic variant of muscle glycogen synthase cannot store glycogen in muscle after meals but are not necessarily hyperglycemic (28). Many normoglycemic individuals maintain normal blood glucose levels with a degree of muscle insulin resistance identical to those with type 2 diabetes (29).
A wide scatter of absolute levels of pancreas triacylglycerol has been reported, with a tendency for higher levels in people with diabetes (57). This large population study showed overlap between diabetic and weight-matched control groups. These findings were also observed in a more recent smaller study that used a more precise method (21). Why would one person have normal β-cell function with a pancreas fat level of, for example, 8%, whereas another has type 2 diabetes with a pancreas fat level of 5%? There must be varying degrees of liposusceptibility of the metabolic organs, and this has been demonstrated in relation to ethnic differences (72). If the fat is simply not available to the body, then the susceptibility of the pancreas will not be tested, whereas if the individual acquires excess fat stores, then β-cell failure may or may not develop depending on degree of liposusceptibility. In any group of people with type 2 diabetes, simple inspection reveals that diabetes develops in some with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal or overweight range, whereas others have a very high BMI. The pathophysiologic changes in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are not different in obese and normal weight people (73), and the upswing in population rates of type 2 diabetes relates to a right shift in the whole BMI distribution. Hence, the person with a BMI of 24 and type 2 diabetes would in a previous era have had a BMI of 21 and no diabetes. It is clear that individual susceptibility factors determine the onset of the condition, and both genetic and epigenetic factors may contribute. Given that diabetes cannot occur without loss of acute insulin response to food, it can be postulated that this failure of acute insulin secretion could relate to both accumulation of fat and susceptibility to the adverse effect of excess fat in the pancreas.

Main message Three key messages were identified from the 2018 guidelines as priorities for FPs: discussing opportunities to reduce the risk of diabetes complications, discussing opportunities to ensure safety and prevent hypoglycemia, and discussing progress on self-management goals and addressing barriers. A theme cutting across these key messages was the need to tailor discussions to the needs and preferences of each person. These important guideline recommendations are highlighted, along with information about relevant tools for implementing the recommendations in real-world practice.
Diabetes can also affect your skin, the largest organ of your body. Along with dehydration, your body’s lack of moisture due to high blood sugar can cause the skin on your feet to dry and crack. It’s important to completely dry your feet after bathing or swimming. You can use petroleum jelly or gentle creams, but avoid letting these areas become too moist.
In the United States, 84.1 million adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes. What’s more, 90% of them don’t know they have it. With prediabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes raises your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is if you have prediabetes, a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program can help you take healthy steps to reverse it.
Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.
Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells.
Diabetes Education Services offers education and training to diabetes educators in the areas of both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes for the novice to the established professional. Whether you are training to be a Certified Diabetes Educator® (CDE®), practicing at an advanced level and interested in board certification, or a health care professional and/or Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE®) who needs continuing education hours to renew your license or CDE®, we have diabetes education information, resources and training; learning and teaching tools; and diabetes online courses available for continuing education (CE). Read our disclaimer for full disclosure.
A wide scatter of absolute levels of pancreas triacylglycerol has been reported, with a tendency for higher levels in people with diabetes (57). This large population study showed overlap between diabetic and weight-matched control groups. These findings were also observed in a more recent smaller study that used a more precise method (21). Why would one person have normal β-cell function with a pancreas fat level of, for example, 8%, whereas another has type 2 diabetes with a pancreas fat level of 5%? There must be varying degrees of liposusceptibility of the metabolic organs, and this has been demonstrated in relation to ethnic differences (72). If the fat is simply not available to the body, then the susceptibility of the pancreas will not be tested, whereas if the individual acquires excess fat stores, then β-cell failure may or may not develop depending on degree of liposusceptibility. In any group of people with type 2 diabetes, simple inspection reveals that diabetes develops in some with a body mass index (BMI) in the normal or overweight range, whereas others have a very high BMI. The pathophysiologic changes in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are not different in obese and normal weight people (73), and the upswing in population rates of type 2 diabetes relates to a right shift in the whole BMI distribution. Hence, the person with a BMI of 24 and type 2 diabetes would in a previous era have had a BMI of 21 and no diabetes. It is clear that individual susceptibility factors determine the onset of the condition, and both genetic and epigenetic factors may contribute. Given that diabetes cannot occur without loss of acute insulin response to food, it can be postulated that this failure of acute insulin secretion could relate to both accumulation of fat and susceptibility to the adverse effect of excess fat in the pancreas.
The number of people with diabetes is rising, both in Canada and around the world. Here in Canada, about 3.4 million have diabetes: that’s just over 9% of our total population. Unfortunately, that number is expected to rise. Diabetes Canada estimates that by 2025, 5 million people (12% of the population) will have diabetes. Around the world, the numbers are similarly gloomy. The World Health Organization estimates that the prevalence of diabetes in people older than 18 years of age rose from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014.
Diabetes was one of the first diseases described,[107] with an Egyptian manuscript from c. 1500 BCE mentioning "too great emptying of the urine."[108] The Ebers papyrus includes a recommendation for a drink to take in such cases.[109] The first described cases are believed to have been type 1 diabetes.[108] Indian physicians around the same time identified the disease and classified it as madhumeha or "honey urine", noting the urine would attract ants.[108][109]
Diabetes also can cause heart disease and stroke, as well as other long-term complications, including eye problems, kidney disease, nerve damage, and gum disease. While these problems don't usually show up in kids or teens who've had type 2 diabetes for only a few years, they can affect them in adulthood, particularly if their diabetes isn't well controlled.
ACEI—angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, ARB—angiotensin receptor blocker, ASA—acetylsalicylic acid, BG—blood glucose, BP—blood pressure, CGM—continuous glucose monitoring, CKD—chronic kidney disease, CV—cardiovascular, CVD—cardiovascular disease, DPP4I—dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor, GLP1RA—glucagonlike peptide 1 receptor agonist, HbA1c—hemoglobin A1c, LDL-C—low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, MR—modified release, NPH—neutral protamine Hagedorn, PCSK9—proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9, SGLT2I—sodium glucose transporter 2 inhibitor, SMBG—self-monitoring of blood glucose, TZD—thiazolidinedione.
Conclusion High-quality diabetes care involves a series of periodic conversations about self-management and about pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments that fit with each patient’s goals (ie, shared decision making). Incorporating these conversations into regular practice provides FPs with opportunities to maximize likely benefits of treatments and decrease the risk of harms, to support patients in initiating and sustaining desired lifestyle changes, and to help patients cope with the burdens of diabetes and comorbid conditions.

The classic oral glucose tolerance test measures blood glucose levels five times over a period of three hours. Some physicians simply get a baseline blood sample followed by a sample two hours after drinking the glucose solution. In a person without diabetes, the glucose levels rise and then fall quickly. In someone with diabetes, glucose levels rise higher than normal and fail to come back down as fast.


Diabetes Education Services offers education and training to diabetes educators in the areas of both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes for the novice to the established professional. Whether you are training to be a Certified Diabetes Educator® (CDE®), practicing at an advanced level and interested in board certification, or a health care professional and/or Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE®) who needs continuing education hours to renew your license or CDE®, we have diabetes education information, resources and training; learning and teaching tools; and diabetes online courses available for continuing education (CE). Read our disclaimer for full disclosure.
With so many technologies in the marketplace, selecting the right app can be overwhelming. Remember that apps are tools designed to create accountability, track data and help users discover patterns and change behaviors. Trying several apps allows you to experiment with features to find the best fit for your lifestyle and needs. Focus on using app technologies that ease the burden of diabetes management instead of complicating it.

Mechanism of interaction between excess amounts of fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and ceramide and insulin action within the hepatocyte. Diacylglycerol activates PKCε and inhibits activation of IRS-1 by the insulin receptor. Ceramides cause sequestration of Akt2 by PKCζ and inhibit insulin control of gluconeogenesis. These mechanisms have recently been reviewed (99). FFA, free-fatty acid; TG, triacylglycerol.


The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority acknowledges that it provides health services in facilities located on the original lands of Treaty 1 and on the homelands of the Metis Nation. WRHA respects that the First Nation treaties were made on these territories and acknowledge the harms and mistakes of the past, and we dedicate ourselves to collaborate in partnership with First Nation, Metis and Inuit people in the spirit of reconciliation.

Through its Improving Management and Prevention program (53% of program spending in F2017), Diabetes Canada advocates for policy changes that promote healthier lifestyles amongst Canadians. Together with partners in the Stop Marketing to Kids (Stop M2K) Coalition, the charity has advocated for restrictions on marketing unhealthy food to children. It reports to have advised the government on changes to the Canada Food Guide and the nutrition facts table on packaged foods. Diabetes Canada also operates a website which offers diabetes resources and information. In F2017, 2.6 million people visited its website.

This is a special edition of the iCookbook app just for people with diabetes. The app delivers new, free diabetes-friendly recipes every month. It also has built-in kitchen tools like conversion charts and timers and voice activation, so the user can proceed through a recipe even with messy hands. The user can save and share recipes or even pull up a random one by shaking the phone.

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