Regular dental visits are important. Research suggests that treating gum disease can help improve blood sugar control in patients living with diabetes, decreasing the progression of the disease. Practicing good oral hygiene and having professional deep cleanings done by your dentist can help to lower your HbA1c. (This is a lab test that shows your average level of blood sugar over the previous three months. It indicates how well you are controlling your diabetes.)
Diabetes Canada is a health charity and advocacy organization that produces comprehensive national guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes in adults and children, with a focus on special populations (those with renal failure, Indigenous peoples, women of child-bearing age, etc). Following a rigorous methodology,9,10 a guideline writing committee, composed of interprofessional diabetes experts, posed then answered clinically relevant questions, resulting in a series of recommendations.10 The evidence supporting the recommendations ranges from levels I to IV and grades A to D.8 The Diabetes Canada guideline committee includes primary care practitioners, endocrinologists, diabetes educators, other specialists, and people living with diabetes from across Canada. The resulting diabetes guideline is reviewed and launched in a 5-year cycle, with interim revisions in the event of important practice-changing evidence and treatment options. For the 2018 guidelines, 9 of the 10 authors responsible for developing recommendations for pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes had no conflicts of interest with industry. In the case of disagreement about conflicts or outright conflicts of interest, committee members removed themselves from discussions. This article does not attempt to revise or critique the Diabetes Canada guideline recommendations but presents a family medicine–oriented approach to applying relevant recommendations in practice.
Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses, a lack of insulin may also develop.[11] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is a combination of excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2]
23andMe can tell you if your genetics are associated with a higher than typical likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. The 23andMe Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report estimates your chances of developing type 2 diabetes by looking at more than 1,000 places in your DNA. The report also equips you with information and tools to help you take action. You can get the Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report and more with 23andMe's Health + Ancestry Service.
Founded in 1953, Diabetes Canada helps those affected by diabetes live healthy lives, prevent the onset and consequences of diabetes and discover a cure. In February 2017, Canadian Diabetes Association rebranded to the new name of Diabetes Canada. With its new name and logo, Diabetes Canada hopes to raise greater public awareness of diabetes and its implication and become the national voice for Canadians living with diabetes. The charity reports that between 200,000 and 350,000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes. An estimated 3.0 million people in Canada are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes while it reports another 7.2 million people are "at-risk" for diabetes. Diabetes Canada states the number of Canadians living with diabetes has doubled in the last 12 years.
Several vision complications can result from type 2 diabetes, from glaucoma to cataracts to the most common, diabetic retinopathy. Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage the blood vessels in the eyes, Sullivan says. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause severe vision loss and even blindness. Nearly half of everyone diagnosed with diabetes has some degree of diabetic retinopathy, according to the National Eye Institute.
Since cardiovascular disease is a serious complication associated with diabetes, some have recommended blood pressure levels below 130/80 mmHg.[89] However, evidence supports less than or equal to somewhere between 140/90 mmHg to 160/100 mmHg; the only additional benefit found for blood pressure targets beneath this range was an isolated decrease in stroke risk, and this was accompanied by an increased risk of other serious adverse events.[90][91] A 2016 review found potential harm to treating lower than 140 mmHg.[92] Among medications that lower blood pressure, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) improve outcomes in those with DM while the similar medications angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) do not.[93] Aspirin is also recommended for people with cardiovascular problems, however routine use of aspirin has not been found to improve outcomes in uncomplicated diabetes.[94]

Once nerve damage sets in, your risk of infection increases because you may not be able to feel an injury, like a cut on your foot, to help it heal early on. In addition to examining your feet every day, check in with your doctor at the first sign of infection, such as redness or swelling. Protect your feet by keeping your skin moisturized with a coat of petroleum jelly or rich cream, but make sure to keep the areas between your toes dry because extra moisture there can increase the risk of infection, the ADA suggests.


The term "type 1 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including childhood-onset diabetes, juvenile diabetes, and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Likewise, the term "type 2 diabetes" has replaced several former terms, including adult-onset diabetes, obesity-related diabetes, and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Beyond these two types, there is no agreed-upon standard nomenclature.[citation needed]
23andMe can tell you if your genetics are associated with a higher than typical likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. The 23andMe Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report estimates your chances of developing type 2 diabetes by looking at more than 1,000 places in your DNA. The report also equips you with information and tools to help you take action. You can get the Type 2 Diabetes Health Predisposition report and more with 23andMe's Health + Ancestry Service.
Although a close relationship exists among raised liver fat levels, insulin resistance, and raised liver enzyme levels (52), high levels of liver fat are not inevitably associated with hepatic insulin resistance. This is analogous to the discordance observed in the muscle of trained athletes in whom raised intramyocellular triacylglycerol is associated with high insulin sensitivity (53). This relationship is also seen in muscle of mice overexpressing the enzyme DGAT-1, which rapidly esterifies diacylglycerol to metabolically inert triacylglycerol (54). In both circumstances, raised intracellular triacylglycerol stores coexist with normal insulin sensitivity. When a variant of PNPLA3 was described as determining increased hepatic fat levels, it appeared that a major factor underlying nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance was identified (55). However, this relatively rare genetic variant is not associated with hepatic insulin resistance (56). Because the responsible G allele of PNPLA3 is believed to code for a lipase that is ineffective in triacylglycerol hydrolysis, it appears that diacylglycerol and fatty acids are sequestered as inert triacylglycerol, preventing any inhibitory effect on insulin signaling.
Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.
People who are obese -- more than 20% over their ideal body weight for their height -- are at particularly high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and its related medical problems. Obese people have insulin resistance. With insulin resistance, the pancreas has to work overly hard to produce more insulin. But even then, there is not enough insulin to keep sugars normal.

Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses, a lack of insulin may also develop.[11] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is a combination of excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2]


The number of people with diabetes is rising, both in Canada and around the world. Here in Canada, about 3.4 million have diabetes: that’s just over 9% of our total population. Unfortunately, that number is expected to rise. Diabetes Canada estimates that by 2025, 5 million people (12% of the population) will have diabetes. Around the world, the numbers are similarly gloomy. The World Health Organization estimates that the prevalence of diabetes in people older than 18 years of age rose from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014.
The mySugr logbook app is an easy and complete diabetes tracker.  Log and monitor your daily blood sugar level, record your insulin, use the app to track your carbohydrate count, and make notes along the way.  + Easy and personalized logging screen to enter information about your diet, medications, carbohydrate intake, meals, blood glucose levels that can be graphed.  Motivating challenges and feedback to help cope with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.  The app provides detailed reports that you can send to your doctor.  mySugr Pro can be activated at no charge with some Accu-Chek® devices when ordered (for free) through mySugr or with a subscription.
Diabetes Care Community is the author of articles on a wide range of diabetes topics. All of these articles are written to a high standard of quality. They are reviewed for accuracy with health care professionals and, wherever possible, will adhere to Diabetes Canada's 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines. It is our wish that you find our articles helpful. We welcome your feedback and comments.

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Culturally appropriate education may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels, for up to 24 months.[91] If changes in lifestyle in those with mild diabetes has not resulted in improved blood sugars within six weeks, medications should then be considered.[23] There is not enough evidence to determine if lifestyle interventions affect mortality in those who already have DM2.[63]
Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world but is more common (especially type 2) in more developed countries. The greatest increase in rates has however been seen in low- and middle-income countries,[101] where more than 80% of diabetic deaths occur.[105] The fastest prevalence increase is expected to occur in Asia and Africa, where most people with diabetes will probably live in 2030.[106] The increase in rates in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the "Western-style" diet).[101][106] The global number of diabetes cases might increase by 48% between 2017 and 2045.[8]
In those with impaired glucose tolerance, diet and exercise either alone or in combination with metformin or acarbose may decrease the risk of developing diabetes.[24][70] Lifestyle interventions are more effective than metformin.[24] A 2017 review found that, long term, lifestyle changes decreased the risk by 28%, while medication does not reduce risk after withdrawal.[71] While low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of diabetes, correcting the levels by supplementing vitamin D3 does not improve that risk.[72]
Hemoglobin A1c or HbA1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells. The HbA1c test is used to monitor blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes over time. Normal HbA1c levels are 6% or less. HbA1c levels can be affected by insulin use, fasting, glucose intake (oral or IV), or a combination of these and other factors. High hemoglobin A1c levels in the blood increases the risk of microvascular complications, for example, diabetic neuropathy, eye, and kidney disease.
"The mySugr Junior App was developed to make managing diabetes easier for kids. It also enables parents to keep control over the therapy, even when they're not around and their child is at school or out with friends. The app resembles a game in which the children get points for every entry. The goal is to score a particular amount of points every day. This encourages kids to take care of their diabetes regularly.

An award-winning diabetes logbook app, Diabetes:M allows users to enter glucose readings, insulin injections, and carbohydrates consumed at meals. There is a bolus calculator as well as a food database for looking up and tracking various foods. Detailed graphs, analytical charts, and the ability to generate reports to share with health-care providers are some of the additional features.
The earliest surviving work with a detailed reference to diabetes is that of Aretaeus of Cappadocia (2nd or early 3rd century CE). He described the symptoms and the course of the disease, which he attributed to the moisture and coldness, reflecting the beliefs of the "Pneumatic School". He hypothesized a correlation between diabetes and other diseases, and he discussed differential diagnosis from the snakebite, which also provokes excessive thirst. His work remained unknown in the West until 1552, when the first Latin edition was published in Venice.[110]

This app focuses on tracking carbs, as well protein, fat, and calories, with a database of foods and a bar-code scanner. You can also log your meals with photos and voice memos. It lets you set and track a weight loss goal, as well as log exercise, though syncing with fitness trackers requires an upgrade to the subscription service. Note that this app includes features for those following a low-carbohydrate diet or the ketogenic diet, and Ilkowitz notes that these types of diets aren’t appropriate for everyone, so be cautious about taking dietary advice from an app and check with your doctor, dietitian, or certified diabetes educator before making changes to your diet.


Diabetes Canada funds research projects (18% of program spending) that search for new treatments and ultimately a cure for diabetes. In F2017, the charity implemented a new research funding model that is aimed to encourage students to commit to careers in diabetes research. In F2017, it funded 6 new Postdoctoral Fellowships which provide support for researchers who have completed a PhD. Diabetes Canada launched 2 new types of awards in F2017: Diabetes Investigator Awards and New Investigator Awards. In F2017, it offered 4 of each type of award. In addition to the 14 newly-funded project, the charity continued to support 43 ongoing grants.
There are two major types of diabetes, called type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes was also formerly called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), or juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas undergoes an autoimmune attack by the body itself, and is rendered incapable of making insulin. Abnormal antibodies have been found in the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes. Antibodies are proteins in the blood that are part of the body's immune system. The patient with type 1 diabetes must rely on insulin medication for survival.
You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts.

^ Boussageon R, Bejan-Angoulvant T, Saadatian-Elahi M, Lafont S, Bergeonneau C, Kassaï B, Erpeldinger S, Wright JM, Gueyffier F, Cornu C (July 2011). "Effect of intensive glucose lowering treatment on all cause mortality, cardiovascular death, and microvascular events in type 2 diabetes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials". BMJ. 343: d4169. doi:10.1136/bmj.d4169. PMC 3144314. PMID 21791495.
Hyperglycemia or high blood sugar is a serious health problem for diabetics. There are two types of hyperglycemia, 1) fasting, and 2)postprandial or after meal hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can also lead to ketoacidosis or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). There are a variety of causes of hyperglycemia in people with diabetes. Symptoms of high blood sugar may include increased thirst, headaches, blurred vision, and frequent urination.Treatment can be achieved through lifestyle changes or medications changes. Carefully monitoring blood glucose levels is key to prevention.
Diabetes Canada’s D-Camps (12% of program spending) address the challenges of isolation and stigma by providing a place for young people with Type 1 diabetes to connect. The summer camps offer outdoor activities and help participants learn how to live with the disease. 1,891 children and youth with type 1 diabetes attended D-Camp programs in F2017.

^ Jump up to: a b c d Vos T, Allen C, Arora M, Barber RM, Bhutta ZA, Brown A, et al. (GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators) (October 2016). "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015". Lancet. 388 (10053): 1545–1602. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31678-6. PMC 5055577. PMID 27733282.


A great app to add to the list is Wellocity Health. It helps you manage chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes by addressing key risk factors. This free app allows users to track medications, vitals and activity and share reports of your progress with your doctor or coach. Actionable insights and realistic goals make it easy to monitor progress and improve. The app also has a built-in community that allow users to share experiences.
For people with Type 1 diabetes, blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration is the standard of care. Patients need to check their blood sugar a number of times a day, then give themselves insulin to replace what would have been made in the pancreas. Treatment for Type 2 diabetes, however, doesn’t involve these critical calculations of insulin. It’s usually maintained with a pretty regular administration of the same drugs on a set schedule.
should maintain a log of their SMBG measurements either by using a memory-equipped BG meter or an electronic record of BG measurement performed at a frequency deemed appropriate by the person with diabetes and his or her health care team. For commercial drivers, for initial commercial license application, the record should include the last 6 mo (or since the diagnosis of diabetes if < 6 mo). BG logs should be verifiable on request (grade D, consensus)
Insulin is a hormone that is produced by specialized cells (beta cells) of the pancreas. (The pancreas is a deep-seated organ in the abdomen located behind the stomach.) In addition to helping glucose enter the cells, insulin is also important in tightly regulating the level of glucose in the blood. After a meal, the blood glucose level rises. In response to the increased glucose level, the pancreas normally releases more insulin into the bloodstream to help glucose enter the cells and lower blood glucose levels after a meal. When the blood glucose levels are lowered, the insulin release from the pancreas is turned down. It is important to note that even in the fasting state there is a low steady release of insulin than fluctuates a bit and helps to maintain a steady blood sugar level during fasting. In normal individuals, such a regulatory system helps to keep blood glucose levels in a tightly controlled range. As outlined above, in patients with diabetes, the insulin is either absent, relatively insufficient for the body's needs, or not used properly by the body. All of these factors cause elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia).
Heather Bartley, 46, a former mail carrier in Yale, Michigan, says she has been using MyFitnessPal for six years and finds it valuable for counting carbs. “It’s very user friendly and free,” she says. While the free version meets her needs, a subscription version unlocks more features. (The current subscription price is $9.99 per month or $49.99 per year.)
In animals, diabetes is most commonly encountered in dogs and cats. Middle-aged animals are most commonly affected. Female dogs are twice as likely to be affected as males, while according to some sources, male cats are also more prone than females. In both species, all breeds may be affected, but some small dog breeds are particularly likely to develop diabetes, such as Miniature Poodles.[123]
^ Jump up to: a b c d Inzucchi SE, Bergenstal RM, Buse JB, Diamant M, Ferrannini E, Nauck M, Peters AL, Tsapas A, Wender R, Matthews DR (March 2015). "Management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, 2015: a patient-centred approach. Update to a position statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes". Diabetologia. 58 (3): 429–42. doi:10.1007/s00125-014-3460-0. PMID 25583541.
^ Pignone M, Alberts MJ, Colwell JA, Cushman M, Inzucchi SE, Mukherjee D, Rosenson RS, Williams CD, Wilson PW, Kirkman MS (June 2010). "Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with diabetes: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association, a scientific statement of the American Heart Association, and an expert consensus document of the American College of Cardiology Foundation". Diabetes Care. 33 (6): 1395–402. doi:10.2337/dc10-0555. PMC 2875463. PMID 20508233.

Home blood sugar (glucose) testing is an important part of controlling blood sugar. One important goal of diabetes treatment is to keep the blood glucose levels near the normal range of 70 to 120 mg/dl before meals and under 140 mg/dl at two hours after eating. Blood glucose levels are usually tested before and after meals, and at bedtime. The blood sugar level is typically determined by pricking a fingertip with a lancing device and applying the blood to a glucose meter, which reads the value. There are many meters on the market, for example, Accu-Check Advantage, One Touch Ultra, Sure Step and Freestyle. Each meter has its own advantages and disadvantages (some use less blood, some have a larger digital readout, some take a shorter time to give you results, etc.). The test results are then used to help patients make adjustments in medications, diets, and physical activities.
Since cardiovascular disease is a serious complication associated with diabetes, some have recommended blood pressure levels below 130/80 mmHg.[89] However, evidence supports less than or equal to somewhere between 140/90 mmHg to 160/100 mmHg; the only additional benefit found for blood pressure targets beneath this range was an isolated decrease in stroke risk, and this was accompanied by an increased risk of other serious adverse events.[90][91] A 2016 review found potential harm to treating lower than 140 mmHg.[92] Among medications that lower blood pressure, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) improve outcomes in those with DM while the similar medications angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) do not.[93] Aspirin is also recommended for people with cardiovascular problems, however routine use of aspirin has not been found to improve outcomes in uncomplicated diabetes.[94]

The apps on Apple's list aren't all from the US, and they don't all target diabetes specifically. While many are tracking and management apps for blood glucose and insulin levels, others are more general purpose apps for eating specific diets, which people with diabetes could benefit from. The list includes mostly consumer-facing apps but one app for doctors, as well as one for kids and one for pregnant women with diabetes.
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