Glucose Wiz keeps your blood sugar and medication logs with time.  Write notes, and see your numbers in chart view to show glucose tendency for before meals, 2 hours after meals and at bedtime.  Export the readings in PDF, CSV, or HTML f0rmat by email to anyone, and print the logs directly from this app. iCloud auto sync is available and you can track and monitor your family members’ readings.

Culturally appropriate education may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels, for up to 24 months.[91] If changes in lifestyle in those with mild diabetes has not resulted in improved blood sugars within six weeks, medications should then be considered.[23] There is not enough evidence to determine if lifestyle interventions affect mortality in those who already have DM2.[63]
Diabetes and high blood pressure are often found together. You can decrease your risk of high blood pressure by increasing physical activity, reducing salt and fat in your diet, limiting alcohol consumption, avoiding tobacco use, reducing stress, and maintaining a healthy body weight. Many people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. Good control of blood pressure can substantially reduce your risk of developing complications.
Type 2 diabetes was also previously referred to as non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), or adult-onset diabetes mellitus (AODM). In type 2 diabetes, patients can still produce insulin, but do so relatively inadequately for their body's needs, particularly in the face of insulin resistance as discussed above. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the cells of the body (particularly fat and muscle cells).
Diabetes in Check, from the recently-IPO'd Everyday Health is a type 2 diabetes management app that features a wide range of tools. It includes diabetes coaching designed by a certified diabetes educator, trackers for blood glucose and medication, reminders, and tools for healthy eating, including a food tracker with a barcode scanner and a recipe database. For a $3.99 subscription, users can get daily personalized food recommendations.

Diabetes was one of the first diseases described,[107] with an Egyptian manuscript from c. 1500 BCE mentioning "too great emptying of the urine."[108] The Ebers papyrus includes a recommendation for a drink to take in such cases.[109] The first described cases are believed to have been type 1 diabetes.[108] Indian physicians around the same time identified the disease and classified it as madhumeha or "honey urine", noting the urine would attract ants.[108][109]


Type 2 diabetes is different. A person with type 2 diabetes still produces insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels normal.
A Great Diabetic Log Program. I have been using this program for several months now and cannot go without it. I can accurately keep my glucose and dietary levels. I can also keep track of my blood pressure readings, weight levels, A1C levels and much more. I can prepare and print many different reports for my doctors. If you are a diabetic, you should use this program.
The twin cycle hypothesis of the etiology of type 2 diabetes. During long-term intake of more calories than are expended each day, any excess carbohydrate must undergo de novo lipogenesis, which particularly promotes fat accumulation in the liver. Because insulin stimulates de novo lipogenesis, individuals with a degree of insulin resistance (determined by family or lifestyle factors) will accumulate liver fat more readily than others because of higher plasma insulin levels. In turn, the increased liver fat will cause relative resistance to insulin suppression of hepatic glucose production. Over many years, a modest increase in fasting plasma glucose level will stimulate increased basal insulin secretion rates to maintain euglycemia. The consequent hyperinsulinemia will further increase the conversion of excess calories to liver fat. A cycle of hyperinsulinemia and blunted suppression of hepatic glucose production becomes established. Fatty liver leads to increased export of VLDL triacylglycerol (85), which will increase fat delivery to all tissues, including the islets. This process is further stimulated by elevated plasma glucose levels (85). Excess fatty acid availability in the pancreatic islet would be expected to impair the acute insulin secretion in response to ingested food, and at a certain level of fatty acid exposure, postprandial hyperglycemia will supervene. The hyperglycemia will further increase insulin secretion rates, with consequent enhancement of hepatic lipogenesis, spinning the liver cycle faster and driving the pancreas cycle. Eventually, the fatty acid and glucose inhibitory effects on the islets reach a trigger level that leads to a relatively sudden onset of clinical diabetes. Figure adapted with permission from Taylor (98).
^ Seida JC, Mitri J, Colmers IN, Majumdar SR, Davidson MB, Edwards AL, Hanley DA, Pittas AG, Tjosvold L, Johnson JA (October 2014). "Clinical review: Effect of vitamin D3 supplementation on improving glucose homeostasis and preventing diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 99 (10): 3551–60. doi:10.1210/jc.2014-2136. PMC 4483466. PMID 25062463.
In older patients with diabetes and multiple comorbidities or frailty, strategies should be used to strictly prevent hypoglycemia, which include the choice of antihyperglycemic therapy and less-stringent HbA1c targets (grade D, consensus). Antihyperglycemic agents that increase the risk of hypoglycemia or have other side effects should be discontinued in these people (grade C, level III)
Type 2 diabetes has long been known to progress despite glucose-lowering treatment, with 50% of individuals requiring insulin therapy within 10 years (1). This seemingly inexorable deterioration in control has been interpreted to mean that the condition is treatable but not curable. Clinical guidelines recognize this deterioration with algorithms of sequential addition of therapies. Insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction are known to be the major pathophysiologic factors driving type 2 diabetes; however, these factors come into play with very different time courses. Insulin resistance in muscle is the earliest detectable abnormality of type 2 diabetes (2). In contrast, changes in insulin secretion determine both the onset of hyperglycemia and the progression toward insulin therapy (3,4). The etiology of each of these two major factors appears to be distinct. Insulin resistance may be caused by an insulin signaling defect (5), glucose transporter defect (6), or lipotoxicity (7), and β-cell dysfunction is postulated to be caused by amyloid deposition in the islets (8), oxidative stress (9), excess fatty acid (10), or lack of incretin effect (11). The demonstration of reversibility of type 2 diabetes offers the opportunity to evaluate the time sequence of pathophysiologic events during return to normal glucose metabolism and, hence, to unraveling the etiology.

Regular dental visits are important. Research suggests that treating gum disease can help improve blood sugar control in patients living with diabetes, decreasing the progression of the disease. Practicing good oral hygiene and having professional deep cleanings done by your dentist can help to lower your HbA1c. (This is a lab test that shows your average level of blood sugar over the previous three months. It indicates how well you are controlling your diabetes.)
There are a number of medications and other health problems that can predispose to diabetes.[40] Some of the medications include: glucocorticoids, thiazides, beta blockers, atypical antipsychotics,[41] and statins.[42] Those who have previously had gestational diabetes are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.[23] Other health problems that are associated include: acromegaly, Cushing's syndrome, hyperthyroidism, pheochromocytoma, and certain cancers such as glucagonomas.[40] Testosterone deficiency is also associated with type 2 diabetes.[43][44]
Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age, but it most commonly begins in middle age or later. Signs and symptoms develop slowly over years. They include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet (diabetic neuropathy), sores that do not heal well, and weight loss. If blood sugar levels are not controlled through medication or diet, type 2 diabetes can cause long-lasting (chronic) health problems including heart disease and stroke; nerve damage; and damage to the kidneys, eyes, and other parts of the body.
Diabetes Tracker helps users take control of type 1 and 2 diabetes as well as prediabetes and gestational diabetes. Document exercise and food intake so you can monitor your weight, and view stats and food grades for different foods. It also allows you to keep tabs on water intake, weight, HbA1c, cholesterol, net carbs, and other health factors. Virtual coaching can assist you in managing your health in addition to the analytical tools. This app delivers diabetes management that is truly at your fingertips.
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