Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar otherwise known as your glucose level. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas produces little or no insulin which is why it has to be checked often. If not managed properly, your sugar can be too high or too low which can cause blurred vision, upset stomach and dizziness.

In type 2 diabetes, there also is a steady decline of beta cells that adds to the process of elevated blood sugars. Essentially, if someone is resistant to insulin, the body can, to some degree, increase production of insulin and overcome the level of resistance. After time, if production decreases and insulin cannot be released as vigorously, hyperglycemia develops.
^ Jump up to: a b c Maruthur NM, Tseng E, Hutfless S, Wilson LM, Suarez-Cuervo C, Berger Z, Chu Y, Iyoha E, Segal JB, Bolen S (June 2016). "Diabetes Medications as Monotherapy or Metformin-Based Combination Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis". Annals of Internal Medicine. 164 (11): 740–51. doi:10.7326/M15-2650. PMID 27088241.
Type 2 diabetes does not have a clear pattern of inheritance, although many affected individuals have at least one close family member, such as a parent or sibling, with the disease. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases with the number of affected family members. The increased risk is likely due in part to shared genetic factors, but it is also related to lifestyle influences (such as eating and exercise habits) that are shared by members of a family.
Family doctors and other primary care clinicians provide most of the care for Canadians living with diabetes and its complications.1 The increasing number and complexity of cases of this chronic disease2 provides an opportunity to ensure better supports are in place for persons with diabetes and their care providers. Given recent pharmacologic advances, as well as new evidence about the potential for specific benefits and harms, clinicians today are faced with a range of options when selecting the most appropriate treatment approach for people with diabetes. The challenge for FPs is compounded by the vast amount of new evidence available on a range of clinical topics relevant to the people with diabetes whom they see in their practices. Guidelines help to summarize evidence, but it is not feasible3 or appropriate4 for FPs to incorporate every single guideline recommendation relevant to primary care into practice. Which high-priority items deserve attention and action? Which recommendations should FPs make a special effort to understand and discuss with their patients?

MySugr aims to make diabetes “suck less” by syncing with other devices to help you monitor vital numbers such as weight, basal rates, and sugar levels. Make sure you’re logging data by setting up reminders that appear on your phone. This can help you stay on top of your condition and report critical facts to your doctor. The pro version of the app can be activated at no charge with some Accu-Chek devices when ordered through mySugr, or you can pay the $2.99 monthly or $27.99 yearly subscription.
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