^ Jump up to: a b c d Inzucchi SE, Bergenstal RM, Buse JB, Diamant M, Ferrannini E, Nauck M, Peters AL, Tsapas A, Wender R, Matthews DR (March 2015). "Management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, 2015: a patient-centred approach. Update to a position statement of the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes". Diabetologia. 58 (3): 429–42. doi:10.1007/s00125-014-3460-0. PMID 25583541.
Most times, this condition is caused by peripheral neuropathy or diabetic polyneuropathy. This is a condition that often happens when the nerve fibers – especially the ones in the hands and feet are damaged by a high level of glucose in the blood. Before the damage to these nerve fibers happens, the cytokines level in the body increases and thus triggers an inflammatory response which can lead to itching in the skin.
On top of tracking your blood glucose and meals (with a nutrition database and bar-code scanner), the Diabetes:M app will calculate insulin boluses for you. Through the Apple Health app, Diabetes:M will sync with other devices, including glucose meters, Fitbit, Garmin, and many others. You’ll need to pay extra for the subscription to access the full food database, sync multiple devices, and get rid of the ads. (The current subscription cost is $4.99 per month or $49.99 per year.)
^ Sarwar N, Gao P, Seshasai SR, Gobin R, Kaptoge S, Di Angelantonio E, Ingelsson E, Lawlor DA, Selvin E, Stampfer M, Stehouwer CD, Lewington S, Pennells L, Thompson A, Sattar N, White IR, Ray KK, Danesh J (June 2010). "Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease: a collaborative meta-analysis of 102 prospective studies". Lancet. 375 (9733): 2215–22. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60484-9. PMC 2904878. PMID 20609967.
Type 1 and type 2 diabetes were identified as separate conditions for the first time by the Indian physicians Sushruta and Charaka in 400–500 AD with type 1 associated with youth and type 2 with being overweight.[112] The term "mellitus" or "from honey" was added by the Briton John Rolle in the late 1700s to separate the condition from diabetes insipidus which is also associated with frequent urination.[112] Effective treatment was not developed until the early part of the 20th century when the Canadians Frederick Banting and Charles Best discovered insulin in 1921 and 1922.[112] This was followed by the development of the long acting NPH insulin in the 1940s.[112]
iSage – A prescription-only patient-facing iOS and Android app that works in conjunction with a web portal used by the doctor. The doctor sets target levels for insulin based on the patient’s glucose levels. Then the algorithm takes over. Patients can enter their blood glucose levels and iSage will change their insulin dosing levels based on the doctor’s plan and the entered values.
Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble.
Regular dental visits are important. Research suggests that treating gum disease can help improve blood sugar control in patients living with diabetes, decreasing the progression of the disease. Practicing good oral hygiene and having professional deep cleanings done by your dentist can help to lower your HbA1c. (This is a lab test that shows your average level of blood sugar over the previous three months. It indicates how well you are controlling your diabetes.)
An award-winning diabetes logbook app, Diabetes:M allows users to enter glucose readings, insulin injections, and carbohydrates consumed at meals. There is a bolus calculator as well as a food database for looking up and tracking various foods. Detailed graphs, analytical charts, and the ability to generate reports to share with health-care providers are some of the additional features.
Diabetes can occur temporarily during pregnancy, and reports suggest that it occurs in 2% to 10% of all pregnancies. Significant hormonal changes during pregnancy can lead to blood sugar elevation in genetically predisposed individuals. Blood sugar elevation during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually resolves once the baby is born. However, 35% to 60% of women with gestational diabetes will eventually develop type 2 diabetes over the next 10 to 20 years, especially in those who require insulin during pregnancy and those who remain overweight after their delivery. Women with gestational diabetes are usually asked to undergo an oral glucose tolerance test about six weeks after giving birth to determine if their diabetes has persisted beyond the pregnancy, or if any evidence (such as impaired glucose tolerance) is present that may be a clue to a risk for developing diabetes.
Researchers looked at 5,185 apps for phones running Google’s Android software or Apple’s iOS system. Out of this total, they found 371 apps that claimed to provide several key components for type 2 diabetes management: recording blood sugar data; reminding patients when they need to do specific things to manage the illness; and educating patients on how to handle conditions like dangerously low or high blood sugar.
The mySugr logbook app is an easy and complete diabetes tracker.  Log and monitor your daily blood sugar level, record your insulin, use the app to track your carbohydrate count, and make notes along the way.  + Easy and personalized logging screen to enter information about your diet, medications, carbohydrate intake, meals, blood glucose levels that can be graphed.  Motivating challenges and feedback to help cope with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.  The app provides detailed reports that you can send to your doctor.  mySugr Pro can be activated at no charge with some Accu-Chek® devices when ordered (for free) through mySugr or with a subscription.
The pain of diabetic nerve damage may respond to traditional treatments with certain medications such as gabapentin (Neurontin), phenytoin (Dilantin), and carbamazepine (Tegretol) that are traditionally used in the treatment of seizure disorders. Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) and desipramine (Norpraminine) are medications that are traditionally used for depression. While many of these medications are not indicated specifically for the treatment of diabetes related nerve pain, they are used by physicians commonly.
The connection may be hard to imagine. But the primary reason that regularly skimping on shuteye can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes is because your hormone levels get thrown out of whack. Specifically, with ongoing sleep loss, less insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar) is released in the body after you eat. Meanwhile, your body secretes more stress hormones (such as cortisol), which helps you stay awake but makes it harder for insulin to do its job effectively. The net effect: Too much glucose stays in the bloodstream, which can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
By eating foods that are rich in fibre, reducing the amount of fat and salt in food selections and adding more fruits and vegetables, you can help control your diet and maintain or lose weight. Canada\'s Food Guide recommends 7 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables each day, depending on your age and sex. Watch your total calories as well as the amount of fat, fibre and salt (sodium).
A second oral agent of another class or insulin may be added if metformin is not sufficient after three months.[78] Other classes of medications include: sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, SGLT2 inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs.[78] As of 2015 there was no significant difference between these agents.[78] A 2018 review found that SGLT2 inhibitors may be better than glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.[94]
Metformin is generally recommended as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes, as there is good evidence that it decreases mortality.[6] It works by decreasing the liver's production of glucose.[87] Several other groups of drugs, mostly given by mouth, may also decrease blood sugar in type II DM. These include agents that increase insulin release, agents that decrease absorption of sugar from the intestines, and agents that make the body more sensitive to insulin.[87] When insulin is used in type 2 diabetes, a long-acting formulation is usually added initially, while continuing oral medications.[6] Doses of insulin are then increased to effect.[6][88]
In animals, diabetes is most commonly encountered in dogs and cats. Middle-aged animals are most commonly affected. Female dogs are twice as likely to be affected as males, while according to some sources, male cats are also more prone than females. In both species, all breeds may be affected, but some small dog breeds are particularly likely to develop diabetes, such as Miniature Poodles.[123]
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MySugr aims to make diabetes “suck less” by syncing with other devices to help you monitor vital numbers such as weight, basal rates, and sugar levels. Make sure you’re logging data by setting up reminders that appear on your phone. This can help you stay on top of your condition and report critical facts to your doctor. The pro version of the app can be activated at no charge with some Accu-Chek devices when ordered through mySugr, or you can pay the $2.99 monthly or $27.99 yearly subscription.
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