In adults with type 2 diabetes with clinical CVD in whom glycemic targets are not achieved with existing antihyperglycemic medication, an antihyperglycemic agent with demonstrated CV outcome benefit should be added to reduce the risk of major CV events (grade A, level IA for empagliflozin; grade A, level IA for liraglutide; grade C, level II for canagliflozin)	Flow sheets:

In people without clinical CVD in whom glycemic targets are not achieved with existing antihyperglycemic medication, incretin agents (DPP4Is or GLP1RAs) or SGLT2Is should be considered as add-on medication over insulin secretagogues, insulin, and TZDs to improve glycemic control, if lower risk of hypoglycemia or weight gain are priorities (grade A, level IA). Acarbose and orlistat can also be considered as add-on medication to improve glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain (grade D, consensus)

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

The WHO estimates that diabetes mellitus resulted in 1.5 million deaths in 2012, making it the 8th leading cause of death.[12][101] However another 2.2 million deaths worldwide were attributable to high blood glucose and the increased risks of cardiovascular disease and other associated complications (e.g. kidney failure), which often lead to premature death and are often listed as the underlying cause on death certificates rather than diabetes.[101][104] For example, in 2017, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimated that diabetes resulted in 4.0 million deaths worldwide,[8] using modeling to estimate the total number of deaths that could be directly or indirectly attributed to diabetes.[8]
Fuchsberger C, Flannick J, Teslovich TM, Mahajan A, Agarwala V, Gaulton KJ, Ma C, Fontanillas P, Moutsianas L, McCarthy DJ, Rivas MA, Perry JRB, Sim X, Blackwell TW, Robertson NR, Rayner NW, Cingolani P, Locke AE, Tajes JF, Highland HM, Dupuis J, Chines PS, Lindgren CM, Hartl C, Jackson AU, Chen H, Huyghe JR, van de Bunt M, Pearson RD, Kumar A, Müller-Nurasyid M, Grarup N, Stringham HM, Gamazon ER, Lee J, Chen Y, Scott RA, Below JE, Chen P, Huang J, Go MJ, Stitzel ML, Pasko D, Parker SCJ, Varga TV, Green T, Beer NL, Day-Williams AG, Ferreira T, Fingerlin T, Horikoshi M, Hu C, Huh I, Ikram MK, Kim BJ, Kim Y, Kim YJ, Kwon MS, Lee J, Lee S, Lin KH, Maxwell TJ, Nagai Y, Wang X, Welch RP, Yoon J, Zhang W, Barzilai N, Voight BF, Han BG, Jenkinson CP, Kuulasmaa T, Kuusisto J, Manning A, Ng MCY, Palmer ND, Balkau B, Stančáková A, Abboud HE, Boeing H, Giedraitis V, Prabhakaran D, Gottesman O, Scott J, Carey J, Kwan P, Grant G, Smith JD, Neale BM, Purcell S, Butterworth AS, Howson JMM, Lee HM, Lu Y, Kwak SH, Zhao W, Danesh J, Lam VKL, Park KS, Saleheen D, So WY, Tam CHT, Afzal U, Aguilar D, Arya R, Aung T, Chan E, Navarro C, Cheng CY, Palli D, Correa A, Curran JE, Rybin D, Farook VS, Fowler SP, Freedman BI, Griswold M, Hale DE, Hicks PJ, Khor CC, Kumar S, Lehne B, Thuillier D, Lim WY, Liu J, van der Schouw YT, Loh M, Musani SK, Puppala S, Scott WR, Yengo L, Tan ST, Taylor HA Jr, Thameem F, Wilson G Sr, Wong TY, Njølstad PR, Levy JC, Mangino M, Bonnycastle LL, Schwarzmayr T, Fadista J, Surdulescu GL, Herder C, Groves CJ, Wieland T, Bork-Jensen J, Brandslund I, Christensen C, Koistinen HA, Doney ASF, Kinnunen L, Esko T, Farmer AJ, Hakaste L, Hodgkiss D, Kravic J, Lyssenko V, Hollensted M, Jørgensen ME, Jørgensen T, Ladenvall C, Justesen JM, Käräjämäki A, Kriebel J, Rathmann W, Lannfelt L, Lauritzen T, Narisu N, Linneberg A, Melander O, Milani L, Neville M, Orho-Melander M, Qi L, Qi Q, Roden M, Rolandsson O, Swift A, Rosengren AH, Stirrups K, Wood AR, Mihailov E, Blancher C, Carneiro MO, Maguire J, Poplin R, Shakir K, Fennell T, DePristo M, de Angelis MH, Deloukas P, Gjesing AP, Jun G, Nilsson P, Murphy J, Onofrio R, Thorand B, Hansen T, Meisinger C, Hu FB, Isomaa B, Karpe F, Liang L, Peters A, Huth C, O'Rahilly SP, Palmer CNA, Pedersen O, Rauramaa R, Tuomilehto J, Salomaa V, Watanabe RM, Syvänen AC, Bergman RN, Bharadwaj D, Bottinger EP, Cho YS, Chandak GR, Chan JCN, Chia KS, Daly MJ, Ebrahim SB, Langenberg C, Elliott P, Jablonski KA, Lehman DM, Jia W, Ma RCW, Pollin TI, Sandhu M, Tandon N, Froguel P, Barroso I, Teo YY, Zeggini E, Loos RJF, Small KS, Ried JS, DeFronzo RA, Grallert H, Glaser B, Metspalu A, Wareham NJ, Walker M, Banks E, Gieger C, Ingelsson E, Im HK, Illig T, Franks PW, Buck G, Trakalo J, Buck D, Prokopenko I, Mägi R, Lind L, Farjoun Y, Owen KR, Gloyn AL, Strauch K, Tuomi T, Kooner JS, Lee JY, Park T, Donnelly P, Morris AD, Hattersley AT, Bowden DW, Collins FS, Atzmon G, Chambers JC, Spector TD, Laakso M, Strom TM, Bell GI, Blangero J, Duggirala R, Tai ES, McVean G, Hanis CL, Wilson JG, Seielstad M, Frayling TM, Meigs JB, Cox NJ, Sladek R, Lander ES, Gabriel S, Burtt NP, Mohlke KL, Meitinger T, Groop L, Abecasis G, Florez JC, Scott LJ, Morris AP, Kang HM, Boehnke M, Altshuler D, McCarthy MI. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes. Nature. 2016 Aug 4;536(7614):41-47. doi: 10.1038/nature18642. Epub 2016 Jul 11.
During this 8-week study, β-cell function was tested by a gold standard method that used a stepped glucose infusion with subsequent arginine bolus (21). In type 2 diabetes, the glucose-induced initial rapid peak of insulin secretion (the first phase insulin response) typically is absent. This was confirmed at baseline in the study, but the first phase response increased gradually over 8 weeks of a very-low-calorie diet to become indistinguishable from that of age- and weight-matched nondiabetic control subjects. The maximum insulin response, as elicited by arginine bolus during hyperglycemia, also normalized. Pancreas fat content decreased gradually during the study period to become the same as that in the control group, a time course matching that of the increase in both first phase and total insulin secretion (Fig. 3). Fat content in the islets was not directly measured, although it is known that islets take up fat avidly (24) and that islet fat content closely reflects total pancreatic fat content in animal models (25). Although a cause-and-effect relationship between raised intraorgan fat levels and metabolic effect has not yet been proven, the time course data following the dietary intervention study are highly suggestive of a causal link (21).
Formal recommendations on how to reverse type 2 diabetes in clinical practice must await further studies. In the meantime, it will be helpful for all individuals with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes to know that they have a metabolic syndrome that is reversible. They should know that if it is not reversed, the consequences for future health and cost of life insurance are dire, although these serious adverse effects must be balanced against the difficulties and privations associated with a substantial and sustained change in eating patterns. For many people, this may prove to be too high a price to pay, but for those who are strongly motivated to escape from type 2 diabetes, the new understanding gives clear direction. Physicians need to accept that long-term weight loss is achievable for a worthwhile proportion of patients (96). In the United States, diabetes costs $174 billion annually (97), and in the United Kingdom, it accounts for 10% of National Health Service expenditure. Even if only a small proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes return to normal glucose control, the savings in disease burden and economic cost will be enormous.

The role of physical activity must be considered. Increased levels of daily activity bring about decreases in liver fat stores (43), and a single bout of exercise substantially decreases both de novo lipogenesis (39) and plasma VLDL (92). Several studies demonstrated that calorie control combined with exercise is much more successful than calorie restriction alone (93). However, exercise programs alone produce no weight loss for overweight middle-aged people (94). The necessary initial major loss of body weight demands a substantial reduction in energy intake. After weight loss, steady weight is most effectively achieved by a combination of dietary restriction and physical activity. Both aerobic and resistance exercise are effective (95). The critical factor is sustainability.
Glucose Buddy Diabetes Tracker also allows you to track insulin, carbohydrates, weight, and ketones.  It allows users to save and view a history of their blood sugar records which helps you identify trends in your health.  You can schedule reminders to measure your blood sugar. The app tracks what time of day you are checking your blood sugar.  You can also add a note to each record.  Glucose integrates with HealthKit by writing all inputted entries to the Health app.  Subscriptions are available for premium features such as other apps, graphs, and custom tagging tools.
iSage – A prescription-only patient-facing iOS and Android app that works in conjunction with a web portal used by the doctor. The doctor sets target levels for insulin based on the patient’s glucose levels. Then the algorithm takes over. Patients can enter their blood glucose levels and iSage will change their insulin dosing levels based on the doctor’s plan and the entered values.
Two new high-priority recommendations in the 2018 guidelines involve preventing hypoglycemia. First, all people with diabetes who take agents that can cause hypoglycemia (ie, insulin or insulin secretagogues) should be counseled on safe driving (ie, having sugar on-hand to prevent lows). A new chapter in the 2018 guidelines (guidelines.diabetes.ca/cpg/chapter21) describes how to assess and manage private and commercial drivers, especially those who take insulin or insulin secretagogues.8 Diabetes Canada has handouts to support conversations regarding safe driving, and the guidelines feature a sample diabetes and driving educational resource to fill out with people who have diabetes (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/patient-resources/drive-safe-with-diabetes.pdf). Second, the guidelines recommend that medications that pose less risk of hypoglycemia should be used preferentially, especially in the elderly (ie, metformin or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors in preference to insulin or insulin secretagogues). Likewise, risks of hypotension should be considered when managing blood pressure. As noted in the previous guideline, recommendations emphasize the safe use of medications when people with diabetes are unwell and when they are at risk of hypovolemia. Euglycemic ketoacidosis is a particular risk with sodium glucose transporter 2 inhibitors, and these should be held on sick days (ie, when patients are at risk of dehydration).17 The Diabetes Canada guidelines have an appendix to support sick-day planning (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/cpg/Appendix-8.pdf) and an appendix for therapeutic considerations for renal impairment (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/cpg/Appendix-7.pdf).8 The website also features patient resources for primary care physicians to use with their patients for sick-day management (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/patient-resources/stay-safe-when-you-have-diabetes-and-sick-or-at-risk-of-dehydration.pdf), as well as for hypoglycemia identification, treatment, and prevention (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/patient-resources/hypoglycemialow-blood-sugar-in-adults.pdf).
Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5]
Diabetes can also result from other hormonal disturbances, such as excessive growth hormone production (acromegaly) and Cushing's syndrome. In acromegaly, a pituitary gland tumor at the base of the brain causes excessive production of growth hormone, leading to hyperglycemia. In Cushing's syndrome, the adrenal glands produce an excess of cortisol, which promotes blood sugar elevation.

^ Imperatore G, Boyle JP, Thompson TJ, Case D, Dabelea D, Hamman RF, Lawrence JM, Liese AD, Liu LL, Mayer-Davis EJ, Rodriguez BL, Standiford D (December 2012). "Projections of type 1 and type 2 diabetes burden in the U.S. population aged <20 years through 2050: dynamic modeling of incidence, mortality, and population growth". Diabetes Care. 35 (12): 2515–20. doi:10.2337/dc12-0669. PMC 3507562. PMID 23173134. Archived from the original on 2016-08-14.
“As soon as I noticed the leaking fluids and the hemorrhaging, I suspected that they might be symptoms of diabetes,” recalls Dr. Clary, who practices in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Ashburn, Virginia. “In my 12 years of experience as an eye doctor, that kind of bleeding usually signals that a buildup of sugar in the patient’s bloodstream has begun to break down the capillaries that feed the retina. The result is often what we call diabetic retinopathy – a condition in which continuing damage to retinal tissue from diabetes can lead to impaired vision or even blindness, if left untreated.”
Diabetes:M is an award-winning diabetes logbook app that was first published in Google Play in April 2013. It was developed by diabetics to meet the needs of people who want to manage all aspects of their condition. Users can track, analyze, review and export data in great detail. Today Diabetes:M is an established tool with nearly 350 000 installations and over 50 000 active users. The application is well known to medical professionals, with many diabetes specialists recommending it to their patients.

Diabetes:M is an award-winning diabetes logbook app that was first published in Google Play in April 2013. It was developed by diabetics to meet the needs of people who want to manage all aspects of their condition. Users can track, analyze, review and export data in great detail. Today Diabetes:M is an established tool with nearly 350 000 installations and over 50 000 active users. The application is well known to medical professionals, with many diabetes specialists recommending it to their patients.
The earliest sign of diabetic kidney disease is an increased excretion of albumin in the urine. This is present long before the usual tests done in your doctor's office show evidence of kidney disease, so it is important for you to have this test on a yearly basis. Weight gain and ankle swelling may occur. You will use the bathroom more at night. Your blood pressure may get too high. As a person with diabetes, you should have your blood, urine and blood pressure checked at least once a year. This will lead to better control of your disease and early treatment of high blood pressure and kidney disease. Maintaining control of your diabetes can lower your risk of developing severe kidney disease.
The progression of nephropathy in patients can be significantly slowed by controlling high blood pressure, and by aggressively treating high blood sugar levels. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) used in treating high blood pressure may also benefit kidney disease in patients with diabetes.

Its Drive for Excellence in Diabetes Care program (17% of program spending) condenses the best research on how to manage diabetes into a set of recommendations people can act on. It recognizes that there is an overwhelming volume of research evidence for front-line health-care providers to stay on top of. By creating the Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada, the best and most recent information is in the hands of front-line healthcare providers. Webinars and local educational events across the country are used to build providers’ knowledge and confidence in applying the Guidelines. In F2017, the charity reports that 16,771 healthcare providers attended 163 Diabetes Canada health education events.


Through its Improving Management and Prevention program (53% of program spending in F2017), Diabetes Canada advocates for policy changes that promote healthier lifestyles amongst Canadians. Together with partners in the Stop Marketing to Kids (Stop M2K) Coalition, the charity has advocated for restrictions on marketing unhealthy food to children. It reports to have advised the government on changes to the Canada Food Guide and the nutrition facts table on packaged foods. Diabetes Canada also operates a website which offers diabetes resources and information. In F2017, 2.6 million people visited its website.
Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. The onset of kidney disease and its progression is extremely variable. Initially, diseased small blood vessels in the kidneys cause the leakage of protein in the urine. Later on, the kidneys lose their ability to cleanse and filter blood. The accumulation of toxic waste products in the blood leads to the need for dialysis. Dialysis involves using a machine that serves the function of the kidney by filtering and cleaning the blood. In patients who do not want to undergo chronic dialysis, kidney transplantation can be considered.
People with diabetes can benefit from education about the disease and treatment, good nutrition to achieve a normal body weight, and exercise, with the goal of keeping both short-term and long-term blood glucose levels within acceptable bounds. In addition, given the associated higher risks of cardiovascular disease, lifestyle modifications are recommended to control blood pressure.[80][81]
Type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes, is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes mainly from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose get into your cells to be used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Too much glucose then stays in your blood, and not enough reaches your cells.
Mechanism of interaction between excess amounts of fatty acids, diacylglycerol, and ceramide and insulin action within the hepatocyte. Diacylglycerol activates PKCε and inhibits activation of IRS-1 by the insulin receptor. Ceramides cause sequestration of Akt2 by PKCζ and inhibit insulin control of gluconeogenesis. These mechanisms have recently been reviewed (99). FFA, free-fatty acid; TG, triacylglycerol.
Diabetes Canada has created several interactive clinical decision support tools to help reduce some of the barriers to implementing these recommendations, including an interactive tool to consider pharmacotherapy options for glycemic control that compares the relative advantages or limitations of different agents (guidelines.diabetes.ca/bloodglucoselowering/pharmacologyt2), an interactive tool for selecting agents for vascular protection (guidelines.diabetes.ca/vascularprotection/riskassessment), and a prescription for cardiovascular protection (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/resources/prescription-for-cardiovascular-protection-with-diabetes.pdf). People with diabetes also require routine monitoring (and relevant action) for neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy, which can be facilitated with a flow sheet (guidelines.diabetes.ca/docs/cpg/Appendix-3.pdf).8

Selected high-priority type 2 diabetes recommendations and relevant tools for FPs: Highlighted recommendations were prioritized for dissemination by those involved in preparing this review. They are not presented in any particular order and are not necessarily the most important recommendations for a given practice or patient; the full guideline is available at guidelines.diabetes.ca.
That’s because when your blood sugar isn’t under control, the excess glucose in your body can increase your chance of developing serious related health conditions. Heart disease, kidney disease, vision issues, and nerve damage are among the problems that can result from poorly managed diabetes, says William Sullivan, MD, a senior physician at the Joslin Diabetes Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston.
A 2018 study suggested that three types should be abandoned as too simplistic.[56] It classified diabetes into five subgroups, with what is typically described as type 1 and autoimmune late-onset diabetes categorized as one group, whereas type 2 encompasses four categories. This is hoped to improve diabetes treatment by tailoring it more specifically to the subgroups.[57]
In 2017, Canadian Diabetes accounting policies changed significantly. Its auditor, Grant Thornton, noted “The presentation of Diabetes Canada statement of revenue and expenses changed in the current year to provide more informative information on the sources of revenue and expenses.”  Apparently, disclosing how much was given to Diabetes Canada in donations, bequests, corporate giving and from charitable foundations was too much information that donors found confusing. Diabetes Canada's new management team writes "Simpler disclosure enhances communications with stakeholders." Charity Intelligence found less information presented on the 2017 audited financial statements. Most notably, government grants are not listed separately. This government funding of $2.8m was disclosed separately on Diabetes Canada's annual charity filing. 

To treat diabetic retinopathy, a laser is used to destroy and prevent the recurrence of the development of these small aneurysms and brittle blood vessels. Approximately 50% of patients with diabetes will develop some degree of diabetic retinopathy after 10 years of diabetes, and 80% retinopathy after 15 years of the disease. Poor control of blood sugar and blood pressure further aggravates eye disease in diabetes.


MySugr aims to make diabetes “suck less” by syncing with other devices to help you monitor vital numbers such as weight, basal rates, and sugar levels. Make sure you’re logging data by setting up reminders that appear on your phone. This can help you stay on top of your condition and report critical facts to your doctor. The pro version of the app can be activated at no charge with some Accu-Chek devices when ordered through mySugr, or you can pay the $2.99 monthly or $27.99 yearly subscription.
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