SparkPeople bills itself as “your personal diet and lifestyle coach,” helping you track small details but also offer a bird's eye view of your wellness. You track your data using its food database, bar-code scanner, and exercise logs. It will sync with many fitness trackers and has built-in videos with exercise demonstrations, as well as a meal-planning function.
Type 2 diabetes is due to insufficient insulin production from beta cells in the setting of insulin resistance.[13] Insulin resistance, which is the inability of cells to respond adequately to normal levels of insulin, occurs primarily within the muscles, liver, and fat tissue.[45] In the liver, insulin normally suppresses glucose release. However, in the setting of insulin resistance, the liver inappropriately releases glucose into the blood.[10] The proportion of insulin resistance versus beta cell dysfunction differs among individuals, with some having primarily insulin resistance and only a minor defect in insulin secretion and others with slight insulin resistance and primarily a lack of insulin secretion.[13]

Most people who develop type 2 diabetes first have insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's cells use insulin less efficiently than normal. As insulin resistance develops, more and more insulin is needed to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range. To keep up with the increasing need, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) make larger amounts of insulin. Over time, the beta cells become less able to respond to blood sugar changes, leading to an insulin shortage that prevents the body from reducing blood sugar levels effectively. Most people have some insulin resistance as they age, but inadequate exercise and excessive weight gain make it worse, greatly increasing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.

Diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage). This makes it hard for your nerves to send messages to your brain and other parts of the body. You may lose feeling in parts of your body or have a painful, tingling, or burning feeling. Neuropathy most often affects the feet and legs. If you have neuropathy, you may not be able to feel a sore on your foot. The sore can become infected. In serious cases, the foot may have to be amputated (removed). People who have neuropathy may continue walking on a foot that has damaged joints or bones. This can lead to a condition called Charcot foot. Charcot foot causes swelling and instability in the injured foot. It can also cause the foot to become deformed. However, this problem can often be avoided. Check your feet every day. See your doctor immediately if you see swelling, redness, and feel warmth in your foot. These can be signs of Charcot foot. Your doctor should also check your feet frequently. Neuropathy also can cause erectile dysfunction in men and vaginal dryness in women.


To take the very best care of yourself, it’s critical to monitor things like medications and meals. This app makes it easy. Input your blood sugar, meals, insulin injections, medication, and other values that impact overall diabetes management. Track meals as bread units or carb units — all of your data syncs to several devices so you can track no matter what you’re using. This app’s ideal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
iSage – A prescription-only patient-facing iOS and Android app that works in conjunction with a web portal used by the doctor. The doctor sets target levels for insulin based on the patient’s glucose levels. Then the algorithm takes over. Patients can enter their blood glucose levels and iSage will change their insulin dosing levels based on the doctor’s plan and the entered values.
The symptoms may relate to fluid loss and polyuria, but the course may also be insidious. Diabetic animals are more prone to infections. The long-term complications recognized in humans are much rarer in animals. The principles of treatment (weight loss, oral antidiabetics, subcutaneous insulin) and management of emergencies (e.g. ketoacidosis) are similar to those in humans.[123]
The World Health Organization recommends testing those groups at high risk[55] and in 2014 the USPSTF is considering a similar recommendation.[59] High-risk groups in the United States include: those over 45 years old; those with a first degree relative with diabetes; some ethnic groups, including Hispanics, African-Americans, and Native-Americans; a history of gestational diabetes; polycystic ovary syndrome; excess weight; and conditions associated with metabolic syndrome.[23] The American Diabetes Association recommends screening those who have a BMI over 25 (in people of Asian descent screening is recommended for a BMI over 23).[60]
How long will diabetes stay away after weight loss? Long-term normal blood glucose control in previously diabetic individuals after bariatric surgery demonstrates that diabetes does not recur for up to 10 years, unless substantial weight gain occurs (86). These observations are consistent with the twin cycle hypothesis and the existence of a trigger level for adverse metabolic effects of fat in the pancreas. Hence, for a given individual with type 2 diabetes, reducing the liver and pancreas fat content below his or her personal trigger levels would be expected to result in a release from the fatty acid–mediated dysfunction. Individual tolerance of different degrees of fat exposure vary, and understanding this liposusceptibility will underpin the future understanding of genetically determined risk in any given environment. However, this should not obscure the central point: If a person has type 2 diabetes, there is more fat in the liver and pancreas than he or she can cope with.

Glucagon is a hormone that causes the release of glucose from the liver (for example, it promotes gluconeogenesis). Glucagon can be lifesaving and every patient with diabetes who has a history of hypoglycemia (particularly those on insulin) should have a glucagon kit. Families and friends of those with diabetes need to be taught how to administer glucagon, since obviously the patients will not be able to do it themselves in an emergency situation. Another lifesaving device that should be mentioned is very simple; a medic-alert bracelet should be worn by all patients with diabetes.
Sometimes the simplest technology is the most important. Jeniece Ilkowitz, CDE, a research nurse and diabetes educator at New York University Langone Health in New York City, recommends that all her patients have this app and set it to show a medical alert on the lock screen, information that can be critical to first responders in an emergency. The Medical ID app is part of the Health app that comes standard on iPhones (therefore, there's no rating on Apple), and it’s simple to set up. If you have an Android device, you’ll have to download it from Google Play.
For Candace Clark, bariatric surgery meant the difference between struggling with weight issues, including medical problems triggered by obesity, and enjoying renewed health and energy. "I felt like I was slowly dying," says Candace Clark, a 54-year-old Barron, Wisconsin, resident who had dealt with weight issues for years. "I was tired of feeling the way [...]
This app, named one of the top diabetes apps by Healthline from 2015 to 2017, offers two options: basic and pro. The basic app function is designed to help manage blood glucose patterns for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There is a section to enter data regarding diet, medications, and blood glucose levels. The upgraded pro version provides features like blood glucose reminders, multi-device syncing, basal rates for pump usersm and priority support. MySugr coaching is one of the newest features by which users can receive personalized advice from certified diabetes educators.
Type 2 DM is characterized by insulin resistance, which may be combined with relatively reduced insulin secretion.[10] The defective responsiveness of body tissues to insulin is believed to involve the insulin receptor. However, the specific defects are not known. Diabetes mellitus cases due to a known defect are classified separately. Type 2 DM is the most common type of diabetes mellitus.[2]
Other technology devices, like physical activity trackers, are being integrated with some continuous glucose monitor (CGM) systems to help demonstrate how activity impacts blood glucose levels. In the fall of 2017, Fitbit partnered with Dexcom to bring CGM data to Fitbit Ionic. Some health-care programs, like UHC Medicare Advantage plans, are even providing piloting programs in which participants who use CGM technology, like Dexcom, are receiving Fitbit activity trackers.
Your doctor may recommend working with a registered dietitian and a personal trainer to help you set up a diabetes weight loss plan. "Diet and exercise is always encouraged as the first line of therapy, but it works better for some people than others," says Sullivan. If you’re obese and having trouble losing weight with diet and exercise alone, your doctor may recommend medications to suppress your appetite and promote weight loss, or even gastric bypass surgery.ause of nontraumatic blindness and kidney failure.[24] It has also been associated with an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia through disease processes such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.[25] Other complications include acanthosis nigricans, sexual dysfunction, and frequent infections.[23]
Glucagon is a hormone that causes the release of glucose from the liver (for example, it promotes gluconeogenesis). Glucagon can be lifesaving and every patient with diabetes who has a history of hypoglycemia (particularly those on insulin) should have a glucagon kit. Families and friends of those with diabetes need to be taught how to administer glucagon, since obviously the patients will not be able to do it themselves in an emergency situation. Another lifesaving device that should be mentioned is very simple; a medic-alert bracelet should be worn by all patients with diabetes.
Meanwhile the ADA, in their most recent update on the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, have lifted the restriction on sodium in the diet of those with diabetes. This brings the recommended daily levels of sodium for people with diabetes in line with the general population at 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day. They also acknowledge that there is not a single diet that fits all people with diabetes.
Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine.
Lack of blood flow can eventually affect your hands and feet and cause pain while you’re walking. This is called intermittent claudication. The narrowed blood vessels in your legs and feet may also cause problems in those areas. For example, your feet may feel cold or you may be unable to feel heat due to lack of sensation. This condition is known as peripheral neuropathy, which is a type of diabetic neuropathy that causes decreased sensation in the extremities. It’s particularly dangerous because it may prevent you from noticing an injury or infection.
^ Rubino F, Nathan DM, Eckel RH, Schauer PR, Alberti KG, Zimmet PZ, Del Prato S, Ji L, Sadikot SM, Herman WH, Amiel SA, Kaplan LM, Taroncher-Oldenburg G, Cummings DE (June 2016). "Metabolic Surgery in the Treatment Algorithm for Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Statement by International Diabetes Organizations". Diabetes Care. 39 (6): 861–77. doi:10.2337/dc16-0236. PMID 27222544.
Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells.
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