Glucosio is an app for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It monitors important metrics such as weight, hemoglobin A1c, ketones, cholesterol, blood pressure, and more. The app also includes glucose target tools and an HbA1c conversion calculator. Set reminders to keep you in tune with taking medication, working out, and other important tasks. You can share data from the app anonymously if you choose.
DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) Consortium; Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network Type 2 Diabetes (AGEN-T2D) Consortium; South Asian Type 2 Diabetes (SAT2D) Consortium; Mexican American Type 2 Diabetes (MAT2D) Consortium; Type 2 Diabetes Genetic Exploration by Nex-generation sequencing in muylti-Ethnic Samples (T2D-GENES) Consortium, Mahajan A, Go MJ, Zhang W, Below JE, Gaulton KJ, Ferreira T, Horikoshi M, Johnson AD, Ng MC, Prokopenko I, Saleheen D, Wang X, Zeggini E, Abecasis GR, Adair LS, Almgren P, Atalay M, Aung T, Baldassarre D, Balkau B, Bao Y, Barnett AH, Barroso I, Basit A, Been LF, Beilby J, Bell GI, Benediktsson R, Bergman RN, Boehm BO, Boerwinkle E, Bonnycastle LL, Burtt N, Cai Q, Campbell H, Carey J, Cauchi S, Caulfield M, Chan JC, Chang LC, Chang TJ, Chang YC, Charpentier G, Chen CH, Chen H, Chen YT, Chia KS, Chidambaram M, Chines PS, Cho NH, Cho YM, Chuang LM, Collins FS, Cornelis MC, Couper DJ, Crenshaw AT, van Dam RM, Danesh J, Das D, de Faire U, Dedoussis G, Deloukas P, Dimas AS, Dina C, Doney AS, Donnelly PJ, Dorkhan M, van Duijn C, Dupuis J, Edkins S, Elliott P, Emilsson V, Erbel R, Eriksson JG, Escobedo J, Esko T, Eury E, Florez JC, Fontanillas P, Forouhi NG, Forsen T, Fox C, Fraser RM, Frayling TM, Froguel P, Frossard P, Gao Y, Gertow K, Gieger C, Gigante B, Grallert H, Grant GB, Grrop LC, Groves CJ, Grundberg E, Guiducci C, Hamsten A, Han BG, Hara K, Hassanali N, Hattersley AT, Hayward C, Hedman AK, Herder C, Hofman A, Holmen OL, Hovingh K, Hreidarsson AB, Hu C, Hu FB, Hui J, Humphries SE, Hunt SE, Hunter DJ, Hveem K, Hydrie ZI, Ikegami H, Illig T, Ingelsson E, Islam M, Isomaa B, Jackson AU, Jafar T, James A, Jia W, Jöckel KH, Jonsson A, Jowett JB, Kadowaki T, Kang HM, Kanoni S, Kao WH, Kathiresan S, Kato N, Katulanda P, Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi KM, Kelly AM, Khan H, Khaw KT, Khor CC, Kim HL, Kim S, Kim YJ, Kinnunen L, Klopp N, Kong A, Korpi-Hyövälti E, Kowlessur S, Kraft P, Kravic J, Kristensen MM, Krithika S, Kumar A, Kumate J, Kuusisto J, Kwak SH, Laakso M, Lagou V, Lakka TA, Langenberg C, Langford C, Lawrence R, Leander K, Lee JM, Lee NR, Li M, Li X, Li Y, Liang J, Liju S, Lim WY, Lind L, Lindgren CM, Lindholm E, Liu CT, Liu JJ, Lobbens S, Long J, Loos RJ, Lu W, Luan J, Lyssenko V, Ma RC, Maeda S, Mägi R, Männisto S, Matthews DR, Meigs JB, Melander O, Metspalu A, Meyer J, Mirza G, Mihailov E, Moebus S, Mohan V, Mohlke KL, Morris AD, Mühleisen TW, Müller-Nurasyid M, Musk B, Nakamura J, Nakashima E, Navarro P, Ng PK, Nica AC, Nilsson PM, Njølstad I, Nöthen MM, Ohnaka K, Ong TH, Owen KR, Palmer CN, Pankow JS, Park KS, Parkin M, Pechlivanis S, Pedersen NL, Peltonen L, Perry JR, Peters A, Pinidiyapathirage JM, Platou CG, Potter S, Price JF, Qi L, Radha V, Rallidis L, Rasheed A, Rathman W, Rauramaa R, Raychaudhuri S, Rayner NW, Rees SD, Rehnberg E, Ripatti S, Robertson N, Roden M, Rossin EJ, Rudan I, Rybin D, Saaristo TE, Salomaa V, Saltevo J, Samuel M, Sanghera DK, Saramies J, Scott J, Scott LJ, Scott RA, Segrè AV, Sehmi J, Sennblad B, Shah N, Shah S, Shera AS, Shu XO, Shuldiner AR, Sigurđsson G, Sijbrands E, Silveira A, Sim X, Sivapalaratnam S, Small KS, So WY, Stančáková A, Stefansson K, Steinbach G, Steinthorsdottir V, Stirrups K, Strawbridge RJ, Stringham HM, Sun Q, Suo C, Syvänen AC, Takayanagi R, Takeuchi F, Tay WT, Teslovich TM, Thorand B, Thorleifsson G, Thorsteinsdottir U, Tikkanen E, Trakalo J, Tremoli E, Trip MD, Tsai FJ, Tuomi T, Tuomilehto J, Uitterlinden AG, Valladares-Salgado A, Vedantam S, Veglia F, Voight BF, Wang C, Wareham NJ, Wennauer R, Wickremasinghe AR, Wilsgaard T, Wilson JF, Wiltshire S, Winckler W, Wong TY, Wood AR, Wu JY, Wu Y, Yamamoto K, Yamauchi T, Yang M, Yengo L, Yokota M, Young R, Zabaneh D, Zhang F, Zhang R, Zheng W, Zimmet PZ, Altshuler D, Bowden DW, Cho YS, Cox NJ, Cruz M, Hanis CL, Kooner J, Lee JY, Seielstad M, Teo YY, Boehnke M, Parra EJ, Chambers JC, Tai ES, McCarthy MI, Morris AP. Genome-wide trans-ancestry meta-analysis provides insight into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes susceptibility. Nat Genet. 2014 Mar;46(3):234-44. doi: 10.1038/ng.2897. Epub 2014 Feb 9.
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Data from the Swedish randomized study of gastric banding showed that a loss of 20% body weight was associated with long-term remission in 73% of a bariatric surgery group, with weight change itself being the principal determinant of glucose control (13). Dietary weight loss of 15 kg allowed for reversal of diabetes in a small group of individuals recently receiving a diagnosis (21). In individuals strongly motivated to regain normal health, substantial weight loss is entirely possible by decreasing food consumption (88). This information should be made available to all people with type 2 diabetes, even though with present methods of changing eating habits, it is unlikely that weight loss can be achieved in those not strongly motivated to escape from diabetes. Some genetic predictors, especially the Ala12 allele at PPARG, of successful long-term weight loss have been identified (89), and use of such markers could guide future therapy. It must be noted that involuntary food shortage, such as a result of war, results in a sharp fall in type 2 diabetes prevalence (90,91).
Studies have identified at least 150 DNA variations that are associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Most of these changes are common and are present both in people with diabetes and in those without. Each person has some variations that increase risk and others that reduce risk. It is the combination of these changes that helps determine a person's likelihood of developing the disease.
If you’re newly diagnosed, your certified diabetes educator can help you prioritize which areas to focus on and can recommend a simple app for just that purpose, says Hughes. Starting in summer 2018, diabetes educators will have access to a brand-new website that will include rigorous reviews of diabetes apps, so they’ll have another tool to help you identify useful apps.
Change in fasting plasma glucose (A), 2 h post-oral glucose tolerance test (B), and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-B) insulin secretion (C) during the 16-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study. Of the 6,538 people studied, diabetes developed in 505. Time 0 was taken as the diagnosis of diabetes or as the end of follow-up for those remaining normoglycemic. Redrawn with permission from Tabák et al. (80).
^ Seida JC, Mitri J, Colmers IN, Majumdar SR, Davidson MB, Edwards AL, Hanley DA, Pittas AG, Tjosvold L, Johnson JA (October 2014). "Clinical review: Effect of vitamin D3 supplementation on improving glucose homeostasis and preventing diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 99 (10): 3551–60. doi:10.1210/jc.2014-2136. PMC 4483466. PMID 25062463.
Diabetic retinopathy (eye problems). This affects the part of your eye called the retina. It is the part of the eye that is sensitive to light and sends messages to your brain about what you see. Diabetes can damage and weaken the small blood vessels in the retina. When the blood vessels of your retina are damaged, fluid can leak from them and cause swelling in your macula. The macula is the part of the retina that gives you sharp, clear vision. Swelling and fluid can cause blurry vision. This makes it hard for you to see. If retinopathy gets worse, it may lead to blindness. Laser surgery can often be used to treat or slow down retinopathy if found early. People who have diabetes should have an eye exam once a year. See your doctor if you have blurry vision for more than 2 days, sudden loss of vision in 1 or both eyes, black or moving gray spots often called “floaters,” flashing lights, or pain or pressure in your eyes.
BlueStar Diabetes is an FDA-approved, Class 2 medical app which provides approved diabetics with 24/7, real-time coaching from a certified diabetes specialist. This comprehensive app is available only by prescription and offers an impressive range of tools tailored to the individual. When registered, users can receive personalized guidance based on their blood glucose, medications, current health, and a review of lifestyle factors.

John P. Cunha, DO, is a U.S. board-certified Emergency Medicine Physician. Dr. Cunha's educational background includes a BS in Biology from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and a DO from the Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences in Kansas City, MO. He completed residency training in Emergency Medicine at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark, New Jersey.

The prognosis of diabetes is related to the extent to which the condition is kept under control to prevent the development of the complications described in the preceding sections. Some of the more serious complications of diabetes such as kidney failure and cardiovascular disease, can be life-threatening. Acute complications such as diabetic ketoacidosis can also be life-threatening. As mentioned above, aggressive control of blood sugar levels can prevent or delay the onset of complications, and many people with diabetes lead long and full lives.

Diabetes Educational Services (DES) has established this website to provide information and education to health care professionals. Nothing in this website constitutes medical advice nor is it a substitute for medical advice. References in this website to any and all specific products, services or processes do not constitute or imply an endorsement or recommendation by Diabetes Educational Services.
The extent of weight loss required to reverse type 2 diabetes is much greater than conventionally advised. A clear distinction must be made between weight loss that improves glucose control but leaves blood glucose levels abnormal and weight loss of sufficient degree to normalize pancreatic function. The Belfast diet study provides an example of moderate weight loss leading to reasonably controlled, yet persistent diabetes. This study showed that a mean weight loss of 11 kg decreased fasting blood glucose levels from 10.4 to 7.0 mmol/L but that this abnormal level presaged the all-too-familiar deterioration of control (87).

Rates of type 2 diabetes have increased markedly since 1960 in parallel with obesity.[17] As of 2015 there were approximately 392 million people diagnosed with the disease compared to around 30 million in 1985.[11][18] Typically it begins in middle or older age,[6] although rates of type 2 diabetes are increasing in young people.[19][20] Type 2 diabetes is associated with a ten-year-shorter life expectancy.[10] Diabetes was one of the first diseases described.[21] The importance of insulin in the disease was determined in the 1920s.[22]

Inhalable insulin has been developed.[125] The original products were withdrawn due to side effects.[125] Afrezza, under development by the pharmaceuticals company MannKind Corporation, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for general sale in June 2014.[126] An advantage to inhaled insulin is that it may be more convenient and easy to use.[127]
The word mellitus (/məˈlaɪtəs/ or /ˈmɛlɪtəs/) comes from the classical Latin word mellītus, meaning "mellite"[114] (i.e. sweetened with honey;[114] honey-sweet[115]). The Latin word comes from mell-, which comes from mel, meaning "honey";[114][115] sweetness;[115] pleasant thing,[115] and the suffix -ītus,[114] whose meaning is the same as that of the English suffix "-ite".[116] It was Thomas Willis who in 1675 added "mellitus" to the word "diabetes" as a designation for the disease, when he noticed the urine of a diabetic had a sweet taste (glycosuria). This sweet taste had been noticed in urine by the ancient Greeks, Chinese, Egyptians, Indians, and Persians.

This evidence, while the best to date, confirmed what previous work had shown. A 2012 Cochrane review assessed all the randomized controlled trials through 2011 that had investigated how testing for blood glucose at home improved outcomes. It included 12 trials involving more than 3,200 patients. By 12 months, the overall benefit to testing, with respect to lab values, was statistically insignificant. There were never any benefits with respect to patient satisfaction.
People with T2D produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use it correctly; this is referred to as being insulin resistant. People with type 2 diabetes may also be unable to produce enough insulin to handle the glucose in their body. In these instances, insulin is needed to allow the glucose to travel from the bloodstream into our cells, where it’s used to create energy.
Onset of type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented through proper nutrition and regular exercise.[61][62][needs update] Intensive lifestyle measures may reduce the risk by over half.[24][63] The benefit of exercise occurs regardless of the person's initial weight or subsequent weight loss.[64] High levels of physical activity reduce the risk of diabetes by about 28%.[65] Evidence for the benefit of dietary changes alone, however, is limited,[66] with some evidence for a diet high in green leafy vegetables[67] and some for limiting the intake of sugary drinks.[33] There is an association between higher intake of sugar-sweetened fruit juice and diabetes but no evidence of an association with 100% fruit juice.[68] A 2019 review found evidence of benefit from dietary fiber.[69]
The classic symptoms of diabetes are polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (increased thirst), polyphagia (increased hunger), and weight loss.[23] Other symptoms that are commonly present at diagnosis include a history of blurred vision, itchiness, peripheral neuropathy, recurrent vaginal infections, and fatigue.[13] Many people, however, have no symptoms during the first few years and are diagnosed on routine testing.[13] A small number of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus can develop a hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (a condition of very high blood sugar associated with a decreased level of consciousness and low blood pressure).[13]
Studies have identified at least 150 DNA variations that are associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Most of these changes are common and are present both in people with diabetes and in those without. Each person has some variations that increase risk and others that reduce risk. It is the combination of these changes that helps determine a person's likelihood of developing the disease.
Glucose Wiz keeps your blood sugar and medication logs with time.  Write notes, and see your numbers in chart view to show glucose tendency for before meals, 2 hours after meals and at bedtime.  Export the readings in PDF, CSV, or HTML f0rmat by email to anyone, and print the logs directly from this app. iCloud auto sync is available and you can track and monitor your family members’ readings.
Onset of type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented through proper nutrition and regular exercise.[61][62][needs update] Intensive lifestyle measures may reduce the risk by over half.[24][63] The benefit of exercise occurs regardless of the person's initial weight or subsequent weight loss.[64] High levels of physical activity reduce the risk of diabetes by about 28%.[65] Evidence for the benefit of dietary changes alone, however, is limited,[66] with some evidence for a diet high in green leafy vegetables[67] and some for limiting the intake of sugary drinks.[33] There is an association between higher intake of sugar-sweetened fruit juice and diabetes but no evidence of an association with 100% fruit juice.[68] A 2019 review found evidence of benefit from dietary fiber.[69]
Heather Bartley, 46, a former mail carrier in Yale, Michigan, says she has been using MyFitnessPal for six years and finds it valuable for counting carbs. “It’s very user friendly and free,” she says. While the free version meets her needs, a subscription version unlocks more features. (The current subscription price is $9.99 per month or $49.99 per year.)
^ Jump up to: a b Cheng J, Zhang W, Zhang X, Han F, Li X, He X, Li Q, Chen J (May 2014). "Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular deaths, and cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis". JAMA Internal Medicine. 174 (5): 773–85. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.348. PMID 24687000.

"A little diabetes monster accompanies the kids through the app and gives feedback on their entries. The child can enter data such as blood glucose levels, food and insulin or take a picture of his meals, but they can also request help whenever the parents are not around. All entries can be sent as a push message or email from within the app to the parents' phone. This way, the child can ask for feedback on calculating carbs or the insulin dose." 

Lifestyle factors are important to the development of type 2 diabetes, including obesity and being overweight (defined by a body mass index of greater than 25), lack of physical activity, poor diet, stress, and urbanization.[10][31] Excess body fat is associated with 30% of cases in those of Chinese and Japanese descent, 60–80% of cases in those of European and African descent, and 100% of cases in Pima Indians and Pacific Islanders.[13] Among those who are not obese, a high waist–hip ratio is often present.[13] Smoking appears to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.[32]
Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with type 1 and type 2 DM. Most cases are mild and are not considered medical emergencies. Effects can range from feelings of unease, sweating, trembling, and increased appetite in mild cases to more serious effects such as confusion, changes in behavior such as aggressiveness, seizures, unconsciousness, and (rarely) permanent brain damage or death in severe cases.[23][24] Moderately low blood sugar may easily be mistaken for drunkenness;[25] rapid breathing and sweating, cold, pale skin are characteristic of low blood sugar but not definitive.[26] Mild to moderate cases are self-treated by eating or drinking something high in sugar. Severe cases can lead to unconsciousness and must be treated with intravenous glucose or injections with glucagon.[27]

In countries using a general practitioner system, such as the United Kingdom, care may take place mainly outside hospitals, with hospital-based specialist care used only in case of complications, difficult blood sugar control, or research projects. In other circumstances, general practitioners and specialists share care in a team approach. Home telehealth support can be an effective management technique.[100]

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5]

The authors: David Kerr, MD, is the director of research and innovation at the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, California, and the creator of ’Appy Feet, an app for people with painful diabetic neuropathy, as well as DiabetesTravel.org and ExCarbs.com—two free resources for people with diabetes. Charis Hoppe is a project coordinator at the William Sansum Diabetes Center for the Santa Barbara 1,000 project. Ceara Axelrod is a data analyst and clinical researcher at the William Sansum Diabetes Center.


^ Boussageon R, Supper I, Bejan-Angoulvant T, Kellou N, Cucherat M, Boissel JP, Kassai B, Moreau A, Gueyffier F, Cornu C (2012). Groop L, ed. "Reappraisal of metformin efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials". PLoS Medicine. 9 (4): e1001204. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001204. PMC 3323508. PMID 22509138.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels normal.
But for most people with Type 2 diabetes not on insulin, testing is inappropriate most of the time. That message is not getting through. At the end of last year, another study was published in JAMA Internal Medicine that quantified the prevalence of glucose testing in adults. Researchers examined a database that contained data on more than 370,000 commercial health insurance and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries who had Type 2 diabetes.

^ Feinman RD, Pogozelski WK, Astrup A, Bernstein RK, Fine EJ, Westman EC, Accurso A, Frassetto L, Gower BA, McFarlane SI, Nielsen JV, Krarup T, Saslow L, Roth KS, Vernon MC, Volek JS, Wilshire GB, Dahlqvist A, Sundberg R, Childers A, Morrison K, Manninen AH, Dashti HM, Wood RJ, Wortman J, Worm N (January 2015). "Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: critical review and evidence base". Nutrition. 31 (1): 1–13. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2014.06.011. PMID 25287761.

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.
Family or personal history. Your risk increases if you have prediabetes — a precursor to type 2 diabetes — or if a close family member, such as a parent or sibling, has type 2 diabetes. You're also at greater risk if you had gestational diabetes during a previous pregnancy, if you delivered a very large baby or if you had an unexplained stillbirth.
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